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THE

PEOPLE'S DICTIONARY

OF THE

BIBLE.

VOL. II.

HABAKKUK-ZUZIMS.

LONDON:

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.

MANCHESTER: AINSWORTH.
GLASGOW: CHAMBERS. DUBLIN: M'GLASHAN.

NEW YORK: WILEY & PUTNAM.

Boston, U.S.: CROSBY & NICHOLLS.

1848.

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DICTIONARY OF THE BIBLE

H A D

HAI

HABAKKUK (H. one who folds his hands), the king of Israel had difficulty to put down a prophet to whom is ascribed the composi- (x. 6, seq.). tion, in three chapters, which in the Bible HÁDÁDRIMMON, a town in the plain stands with his name (i. 1). Of his history Megiddo, where took place the unsuccessful nothing certain is known. Jewish tradition battle of Josiah against the Egyptians, in represents that his abode was at Bethsachar, which that excellent monarch received a in the territory of Simeon, and that he him- mortal wound (2 Kings xxiii. 29; comp. self, after the destruction of Jerusalem by Zech. xii. 11). Nebuchadnezzar, was carried to Babylon, HADRACH, a district which, with probawhere he had intercourse with Daniel. bly a city of the same name, lay on the east

His brief work may be referred to a short of Damascus (Zech. ix. 1). time before the first invasion of the Assy- HAGAR. See ABRAHAM (i. 11). rians, who appear here, as hitherto, person- HAGARENES, an Arab tribe mentioned ally unknown to the Israelites (i. 6-10). in Ps. lxxxiii. 6, in union with other tribes This would fix the piece in the reign of Je of the same people, and whom we may conhoiakim, cir. 610 A.C. Its contents refer clude the Hebrews regarded as descendants to the approaching invasion of the kingdom of Hagar (Gen. xxv. 12). The same tribe of Judah, whose ruin at the hand of the appears to be meant in 1 Chron. v. 10, 19, Chaldees he knows and declares to be near. seq. under the modified name Hagarites, That ruin is described as the result of na- dwelling on the borders of Reuben, by whom tional wickedness. Those who were instru- they were defeated and expelled from their ments in God's hand for the punishment of territory. his guilty people were themselves, on ac- HAGGAI (H. one who observes a festival), count of their own guilt, to be punished and the earliest prophet after the captivity, from overthrown. These subjects are embraced whom we have a collection of short oracles in chapters i. and ii., which, forming a com- relating to the rebuilding of the temple, plete whole, justify God's dealings with trans- under Zerubbabel, on the return of the first gressors. Chapter iii. is a separate piece, colony from Babylon. The writing, which bearing the name of a prayer of Habak- has several distinct notices of time, is to be kuk,' which in point of beauty may endure referred to the period of Darius Hystaspis comparison with David's odes, and was re- (cir. 520 A.C.). Owing to the interference ceived by the Jews into the collection of of the Samaritans and the indifference of poetry used in the temple-service.

the Jews, who employed all their zeal in A tone of heartfelt sorrow and anxiety pre building houses and mansions for themFails in Habakkuk, who, labouring to un- selves, the restoration of the temple was derstand present and coming events, throws suffered to lie neglected; when Haggai and open bis heart to the reader. Two things, Zechariah came forward to awaken the peohowever, are to him very clear, namely, that ple to a sense of their duty, and aid Zerubsin and suffering are yoke-fellows, and that babel in forwarding the important work

the just shall live by his faith ;' that is, shall (comp. Ezra v.). Chap. ii. 5-9 contains & in the midst of calamities be preserved of remarkable promise of success on the efforts God, in consequence of his fidelity (ii. 4). to which Haggai endeavours to rouse the Parts of the piece are of great force and people. This promise, which refers to Zebeauty (i. 6-10, 12, 13; ii. 18—20; iii. 2- rubbabel, Rabbi Akiba and most Christian 7,17–19). The language employed for the commentators apply to the Messiab. expression of the prophet's confidence in No trustworthy information has come God (iii. 17, 18) has become a sacred and down to us respecting Haggai, the preserappropriate formulary of high and abiding vation of whose short composition affords a trust.

striking instance of the longevity of human HADADEZER, a king of Zobah in Syria, thoughts when they relate to great religious whose kingdom was subdued by David (2 and social realities, and are expressed in a Sam. viii. 3—8), a conquest which occa- manner befitting those important subjects. sioned a transjordanic confederacy which HAIL (T., Ger. hagel), rain frozen in

Vol. II,

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