Conserving Living Natural Resources: In the Context of a Changing World

Capa
Cambridge University Press, 14 de mar de 2002 - 426 páginas
Conserving Living Natural Resources is an introductory textbook for students of conservation biology and resource management. It presents the historical and conceptual contexts of three seminal approaches to the management of living natural resources: utilitarian management for harvest of featured species and control of unwanted species, protection and restoration of populations and habitats to maintain biodiversity, and management of complex ecosystems to sustain both productivity and biodiversity. Rather than endorsing a single approach as the only correct one, this book investigates the historical and philosophical contexts, conceptual frameworks, principal techniques, and the limitations of each approach.
 

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Conteúdo

Historical context the commodification of resources and the foundations of utilitarian resource management
29
11 Historical background
30
Habitat alteration declines and extinctions
32
13 Diagnosing the problem
52
Central concepts population growth and interactions between populations
60
22 Limits to population size
61
23 Types of population growth
62
Predation
71
93 Enhancing the size and range of populations
230
Which species should we try to save?
243
Techniques protecting and restoring ecosystems
246
102 Protecting communities
249
103 Restoring communities
267
Management to maintain processes and structures a sustainableecosystem approach to conservation
277
Historical context pressures to move beyond protection of species and reserves
279
111 Practical considerations
280

Central concepts habitats
77
31 Ecosystems
78
32 How habitats provide the resources needed by organisms
80
33 Changes in communities over time
89
Techniques harvest management
99
42 Kinds of harvest
100
43 Managing for sustained yield
105
Techniques habitat management
123
Modifying succession
130
53 Arranging habitat components
137
54 Managing for multiple uses
138
55 Conclusions
140
Techniques management to minimize conflicts between pest species and people
143
62 How is damage from pests controlled?
145
63 Historical background
147
64 Case studies
150
65 Conclusions
157
Protection and restoration of populations and habitats a preservationist approach to conservation
161
Historical contextthe rise of environmental concerns after World War II
163
71 Economic and demographic changes
164
72 Awareness of ecological problems
165
73 Diagnosing the problem
185
The rise of preservationist management
190
Central concepts the causes of extinction
194
82 How many species are there?
201
83 Classification
202
84 Extinction
204
Techniques protecting and restoring species
225
92 Decreasing losses
226
112 Scientific considerations
281
113 Political considerations
282
114 Ethical considerations
285
115 Philosophical considerations
291
116 Diagnosing the problem
296
The rise of sustainableecosystem management
297
Central concepts the flux of nature
301
121 Revisiting equilibrium theories
302
The flux of nature
315
123 Implications of the fluxofnature viewpoint for conservation strategies
321
124 Conclusions
322
Techniquesconserving processes and contexts
327
131 Conserving processes
328
132 Recognizing limits and assessing vulnerability
331
133 Geographic context
356
134 Examples
358
Techniques including people in the conservation process
370
141 Sustainable use versus sustained yield
371
142 Returning profits from biodiversitybased products to local communities
373
143 Integrating economic development and conservation
374
144 Basing resource management in local communities
378
145 Locating reserves in a compatible landscape
381
146 Evaluating attempts to include people in the conservation process
390
147 Conclusions
391
Postscript
396
Scientific names of organisms mentioned in the text
398
Index
407
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Página 1 - But man is everywhere a disturbing agent. Wherever he plants his foot, the harmonies of nature are turned to discords. The proportions and accommodations which insured the stability of existing arrangements are overthrown. Indigenous vegetable and animal species are extirpated, and supplanted by others of foreign origin, spontaneous production is forbidden or restricted, and the face of the earth is either laid bare or covered with a new and reluctant growth of vegetable forms, and with alien tribes...
Página 4 - Their arguments are curiously like those of the devil, devised for the destruction of the first garden — so much of the very best Eden fruit going to waste; so much of the best Tuolumne water and Tuolumne scenery going to waste. Few of their statements are even partly true, and all are misleading. Thus, Hetch Hetchy, they say, is a "low-lying meadow.
Página 4 - Conservation, conservation, panutilization," that man and beast may be fed and the dear Nation made great. Thus long ago a few enterprising merchants utilized the Jerusalem temple as a place of business instead of a place of prayer, changing money, buying and selling cattle and sheep and doves; and earlier still, the first forest reservation, including only one tree, was likewise despoiled. Ever since the establishment of the Yosemite National Park, strife has been going on around its borders and...

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