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The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of War, accompanying his reports on the several petitions of James Adams, Lewis Anderson, John Ashton, Thomas Baker, Rufus Blodget, Patrick Campbell, Charles Clingan, Robert Crooke, Charles Croxall, Thomas Davidson, John Davis, Stephen Drayton, William Frost, Nathan Fuller, Philip Greenwalt, James Groves, John Hoge, Timothy Hosmer, Joseph How, Rosina Jones, John Knight, Joseph Lawrance, Samuel Lindsay, William Mackay, James McClure, Thomas Napier, David Henderson, and Alexander Low, Elizabeth Parker, Andrew Pepin, James Robertson, Christiana Rush, William Scott, Francis Shaffner, Joseph Smith, John Townes, and Leonard Walter; which were read, and ordered to lie on the table.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Otis, their Secretary:

Mr. Speaker : I am directed to inform this House that the Senate, having completed the legislative business before them, are now about to adjourn without day. And then he withdrew.

On motion, Resolved, That Mr. Boudinot, Mr. Sedgwick, and Mr. Hindman, be appointed a committee, jointly, with a committee on the part of the Senate, to wait on the President of the United States, and inform him that Congress is re to adjourn without day, unless he may have any farther communications to make to them.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Otis, their Secretary:

Mr. Speaker: The Senate have agreed to the resolution of this House for the appoint. ment of a Joint Committee, to wait on the President of the United States, and inform him of the intended recess of Congress, and have appointed a committee for that purpose, on their part.: And then he withdrew.

On a motion made and seconded, That the thanks of the House of Representatives be presented to Jonathan Trumbull, in testimony of their approbation of his conduct in the chair, and in the execution of the difficult and important trust reposed in him, as Speaker of the said House,

It was resolved unanimously: Whereupon, Mr. Speaker made his acknowledgments to the House, in manner following: GENTLEMEN: You have made me very happy by this testimony of your approbation of my conduct in the chair. I feel, at the same time, an additional pleasure in this oppor. tunity of rendering to you my sincere acknowledgments for the kind candor and indulgence, as well as the constant aid and support, which I have experienced in the performance of the duty which you were pleased to assign me. Be assured, gentlemen, I shall ever retain a grateful sense of your goodness—and you will suffer me to add, that my best wishes for your welfare and happiness, in public and private life, will attend each member of this honorable body.

Mr. Boudinot, from the Joint Committee appointed to wait on the President of the United States, and inform him of the intended recess of Congress, reported that the committee had performed that duty, and that the President was pleased to say he had no farther communication to make during the present session: Whereupon,

Mr. Speaker adjourned the House sine die.

A SUPPLEMENTAL JOURNAL

of such Proceedings as, during the time they were depending, were

ordered to be kept secret.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1792. A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr: Lear, his Secretary, as followeth:

UNITED STATES, November 7th, 1792. Gentlemen of the Senate and of the House of Representatives :

I lay before you copies of certain papers relative to the Spanish interference in the execution of the treaty entered into in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety, between the United States and the Creek Nation of Indians, together with a letter from the Secretary of State to the President of the United States, on the same subject.

G. WASHINGTON. The papers accompanying the said message were read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The Speaker laid before the House two letters from Thomas Barclay, consul of the United States at the Court of Morocco, one dated the twenty-eighth of May, the other the seventeenth of July, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two, enclosing petitions from Richard O'Brian, in behalf of himself and other citizens of the United States, now in captivity at Algiers, stating the peculiar hardships they have undergone during the time they have been kept in slavery, and praying that Congress will consider their distressed situation, and take such measures for their releasement, as to their wisdom shall seem meet.

Ordered, That the said letters and petitions be referred to the Secretary of State, for information.

The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of War, accompany. ing the following papers, to wit:

“ 1st. A statement of the measures taken, and the overtures made, to procure a peace with the Indians Northwest of the Ohio."

“2d. Information received relatively to the pacific overtures and the disposition of the Indians Northwest of the Ohio."

“3d. A statement of the measures which have been taken to conciliate and quiet the Southern Indians.”

« 4th. Information received relatively to the disposition of the Southern Indians, and the causes of the hostilities of part of the Cherokees and Creeks."

“ 5th. A statement of the troops in the service of the United States." The said letter and statements were partly read.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8. The House resumed the reading of the papers communicated yesterday by the Secretary of War, relative to the Indians Northwest and South of the river Ohio, and to the troops in the service of the United States, and made a farther progress therein.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9. The House resumed the reading of the papers communicated by the Secretary of War, on Wednesday last, relative to the Indians Northwest and South of the River Ohio, and to the troops the service of the United States, and made a farther progress therein.

VoL, I.-93.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10. The House resumed the reading of the papers communicated by the Secretary of War, on Wednesday last, relative to the Indians Northwest and South of the River Ohio, and to the troops in the service of the United States, and made a farther progress therein.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12. The House resumed the reading of the papers communicated by the Secretary of War, on Wednesday last, relative to the Indians Northwest and South of the River Ohio, and to the troops in the service of the United States, and made a farther progress therein.

TAURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15. The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of War, accompany. ing an extract of a letter to him, from James Seagrove, temporary agent to the Creek Indians, dated the twenty-eighth ultimo, containing further information relative to Indian affairs in the Southern department; which were read, and ordered to lie on the table:

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16. The House resumed the reading of the papers communicated by the Secretary of War, on the seventb instant, relative to the Indians Northwest and South of the River Ohio, and to the troops in the service of the United States, and made a farther progress therein.

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6. A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Lear, his Secretary, as followeth:

UNITED STATES, December the 6th, 1792. Gentlemen of the Senate and of the House of Representatives:

The several measures which have been pursued to induce the hostile Indian tribes, North of the Ohio, to enter into a conference or treaty with the United States, at which all causes of difference might be fully understood, and justly and amicably arranged, have already been submitted to both Hlouses of Congress. The papers, herewith sent, will inform you of the result.

G. WASHINGTON. The papers accompanying the said message were read, and ordered to be on the table.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7. A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Lear, his Secretary, as followeth:

UNITED STATES, December 7th, 1792. Gentlemen of the Scnate and of the House of Representatives:

I lay before you two letters, with their enclosures, from the Governor of the Southwestern Territory, and an extract of a letter to him from the Department of War.

These, and a letter of the ninth of October last, which has been already communicated to you, from the same Department to the Governor, will show in what manner the first section of the act of the last session, which provides for calling out the Militia, for the repelling of Indian invasions, has been executed. It remains to be considered by Comgress, whether, in the present situation of the United States, it be advisable or not, to pursue any further or other measures, than those which have already been adopted. The nature of the subject does, of itself, call for your immediate attention to it; and, I must add, that, upon the result of your deliberations, the future conduct of the Executive will, on this occasion, materially depend.

G. WASHINGTON

Ordered, That the said message, together with the papers herein referred to, be committed to a Committee of the Whole House on Monday next.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10.

The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the message from the President of the United States, of the se. venth instant, together with the papers therein referred to, relative to the execution of the act for calling out the Militia to repel the invasions of the Indians; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Dayton reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said message and papers under consideration, and made some progress therein.

Resolved, that this House will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said message and papers.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11.'

The House, according to the order of the day, again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the message from the President of the United States, of the se. venth instant, together with the papers therein referred to, relative to the execution of the act for calling out the Militia to repel the invasions of the Indians; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Dayton reported that the committee had, according to order, again had the said message and papers under consideration, and made a farther progress therein.

Resolved, That this House will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said message and papers.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14.

The House, according to the order of the day, again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the message from the President of the United States, of the seventh instant, together with the papers therein referred to, relative to the execution of the act for calling out the Militia to repel the invasions of the Indians; and, after some time spent therein, Mr Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Sedgwick reported that the committee had, according to order, again had the said message and papers under consideration, and made a farther progress therein.

Resolved, That this House will, on Monday next, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said message and papers.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17.

The House, according to the order of the day, again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the message from the President of the United States, of the seventh instant, together with the papers therein referred to, relative to the execution of the act for calling out the Militia to repel the invasions of the Indians; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Dayton reported that the committee had, according to order, again had the said message and papers under consideration, and come to no resolution thereupon.

On motion, Ordered, That the committee of the Whole House be discharged from the farther consideration of the same, and that the said message and papers do lie on the table.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18.

The House proceeded to consider the message from the President of the United States, of the seventh instant, together with the papers therein referred to, relative to the execution of the act for calling out the Militia to repel the invasions of the Indians, which lay on the table: Whereupon,

A motion being made and seconded that the House do come to the following reso. lution:

Resolved, that the President of the United States be authorized to employ such part of the military force and of the Militia of the United States, as he may judge necessa:

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