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year, as far as the same can be then ascertained; and as soon thereafter as circumstances will permit, of such receipts and expenditures as cannot be specified in the first statement.

Third. That, within the month of January in each year, if Congress shall be then in session, or, if not then in session, within the first week of each succeeding session, the Secretary of the Treasury shall lay before the House of Representatives an accurate statement of receipts and expenditures down to the last day of the month of December immediately preceding, including the said day; in which statement shall be distinguished the expenditures which fall under each head of appropriation, and shall be shewn the sums, if any, which remain unexpended of such appropriations. And that a committee be thereupon forthwith appointed to examine the said statement, and report concerning the same to the House, and that this be considered as a standing order:",

Ordered, That the said motions be referred to Mr. Gerry, Mr. Dayton, and Mr. Barnwell; that they do examine the matter thereof, and report the same, with their opinion thereupon, to the House.

The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill for establishing the Post Office and Post Roads within the United States; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Smith, of South Carolina, reported that the commtitee had, according to order, had the said bill under consideration, and made some progress therein.

Resolved, That this house will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a committee of the Whole House on the said bill.

Mr. Laurance, from the committee to whom was re-committed the bill making appropriation for the support of Government, for the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two, reported an amendatory bill; which was received, and ordered to lie on the table.

The other orders of the day were further postponed until to-morrow.
And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7. An amendatory bill making appropriations for the support of Government, for the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two, was read the first time.

On motion, The said bill was read the second time, and ordered to be engrossed, and read the third time to-morrow.

The petitions of William Leeds and Griffith Rees were presented to the House and read, respectively praying relief, in consideration of wounds received in the scrvice of the United States during the late war, which have disabled them from labor.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the Secretary of War, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

A petition of Thomas Geese was presented to the House and read, praying to be, reimbursed the amount of duties paid on a quantity of damaged teas, imported by the petitioner, and of which he has sustained a total loss,

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

A petition of Elijah Bostwick was presented to the House and read, paying to be reimbursed the amount of certain costs of suit, which he has been compelled to pay, for supplies purchased for the Army of the United States, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to Mr. Silvester, Mr. Key, and Mr. Grove; that they do examine the matter thereof, and report the same, with their opinion there. upon, to the House.

A petition of Henry Emanuel Lutterloh was presented to the House and read, praving a reconsideration of his former petitions, claiming the pay and emoluments of a Colonel, in consideration of military services rendered in the Army of the United States, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition do lie on the table.

The House, according to the order of the day, again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill for establishing the Post Office and Post Roads, within the United States; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Smith, of South Carolina, reported that the committee had, according to order, again had the said bill under consideration, and made a further progress therein.

Resolved, That this House will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said bill.

The several orders of the day were further postponed until to-morrow.
And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8.

An engrossed bill making appropriations for the support of Government, for the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two, was read the third time.

Resolved, That the said bill do pass, and that the title be, “ An act making appropriations for the support of Government, for the year one thousand seren hundred and ninety-two."

Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do carry the said bill to the Senate, and desire their concurrence.

A memorial of Aaron Cook was presented to the House and read, praying rebef in consideration of a wound received in the service of the Cnited States during the late war, which has rendered him unable to procure a livelihood by labor.

Ordered, That the said memorial be referred to the Secretary of War, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

Memorials of the several Societies “for promoting the abolition of slavery, for the relief of free negroes, unlawfully held in bondage, and for improving the condition of the African race," in the States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia, were presented to the House and read, respectively praying that the African trade may be totally prohibited to the citizens of these United States, for the supply of slaves to foreigners; that foreign ships, destined for that trade, may be prohibited from fiting in the ports of the United States; and that proper regulations may be adopted for the humane treatment of slaves imported into the States admitting such importations

Ordered, That the said memorials be referred to Mr. Benson, Mr. Baldwin, Mr. Dayton, Mr. Smith, of South Carolina, and Mr. Learned; that they do examine the matter thereof, and report the same, with their opinion thereupon, to the House.

On motion, Ordered, That the petition of Henry Emanuel Lutterloh, which was presented yesterday, together with the report of the Secretary of War, of the twentieth of May, one thousand seven hundred and ninety, on a former petition of the said Henry Emanuel Lutterloh, be referred to Mr. Grove, Mr. Schoonmaker, and Mr. Bourne, of Rhode Island; that they do examine the matter thereof, and report the same, with their opinion thereupon, to the House.

"The House, according to the order of the day, again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill for establishing the post office and post roads of the United States; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Smith, of South Carolina, reported that the committee had, according to order, again had the said bill under consideration, and made a farther progress therein.

Resolved, That this House will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said bill.

The several orders of the day were further postponed until to-morrow.
And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Otis, their Secretary:

Mr. Speaker: The Senate have passed the bill, entitled “ An act apportioning Ripresentatives among the People of the United States," with several amendments; to which they desire the concurrence of this House. And then he withdrew.

The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of State, accompanying his report on the petition of Samuel Breck, and others, proprietors of the sail cloth manufactory, in the town of Boston; which were read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The House, according to the order of the day, again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill for establishing the post office and post roads within the United States; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the committee had, according to order, again had the said bill under consideration, and made a further progress therein.

Resolred, That this House will, on Monday next, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said bill.

The several orders of the day were further postponed until Monday next.
And then the House adjourned until Monday morning eleven o'clock.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12. The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, accompanying his report on the memorial of George Webb, referred to him, pursuant to an order of this House, of the twenty-fourth of February last; which were read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The petitions of sundry inhabitants of the County of Northumberland, in the State of Pennsylvania, were presented to the House and read, praying that so much of an act, passed at the last session, imposing a duty on spirits distilled within the United States, as respects the duty on spirits distilled from materials the growth or produce of the United States, may be repealed.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, for his information.

A petition of Thomas Smith was presented to the House and read, praying the settlement of a claim against the United States, for his services as a commissary of military stores, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Secretary of War, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

A petition of Gilbert Dench was presented to the House and read, praying to be reimbursed the amount of sundry sums, which he has been compelled to pay, on account of the United States, for the transportation of military stores, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

A petition of Charles Hateley, of the State of South Carolina, was presented to the House and read, praying that an exclusive prior right of patent may be reserved to him in a machine, which he has invented, for whitening or cleansing rice; provided he shall, within a reasonable time, comply with the requisites of the law, in such cases.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Secretary of State, for his information.

A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Lear, his Secretary, as followeth:

UNITED STATES, December 12, 1791. Gentlemen of the Senate and of the House of Representatives :

It is with great concern that I communicate to you the information received from Major General St. Clair, of the misfortune which has befallen the troops under his command.

Although the national loss is considerable, according to the scale of the event, yet it may be repaired without great difficulty, excepting as to the brave men who have fallen on the occasion, and who are a subject of public as well as private regret.

A farther communication will shortly be made of all such matters as shall be necessary to enable the Legislature to judge of the future measures which it may be proper to pursue.

GEORGE WASHINGTON. The papers referred to in the said message were read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The House proceeded to consider the amendments proposed by the Senate to the bil, entitled “An act apportioning Representatives among the People of the United States, according to the first enumeration;" and made some progress therein.

The several orders of the day were further postponed until to-morrow.
And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13.

A petition of Obadiah Gore, administrator of the estate of Lieutenant Timothy Pierce, deceased, was presented to the House and read, praying that the accounts of the said deceased, for his services, may be settled, and that the half-pay, and other emoluments of the commission of the said deceased, who was slain in the service of the United States, during the late war, may be extended to his widow and two orphan children. Also,

A petition of William Wirtz, praying compensation for services as barrack-master, and assistant commissary of prisoners, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the Secretary of War, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

A petition of John Frederick Amelung, proprietor of the glass manufactory, at New Bremen, in the State of Maryland, was presented to the House and read, praying the patronage of Congress to his undertaking, and that Government will assist him with a loan of money, or other means, to further the same.

Ordered, That the said petition do le on the table.

A memorial of James Wilson, and others, in behalf of the Land Companies of the Illinois and Oubache, was presented to the House and read, praying to be permitted to exhibit the titles of the Companies to certain Western lands, heretofore purchased by the said Companies, under the sanction of lawful authority; and also to make certain proposals for a reasonable compromise, between them and the United States.

Ordered, That the said memorial be referred to Mr. Livermore, Mr. Fitzsimons, and Mr. Clarke; that they do examine the matter thereof, and report the same, with their opinion thereupon, to the House.

A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Lear, his Secretary, as followeth:

UNITED STATES, December 13th, 1791. Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives : - I place before you the plan of a City that has been laid out within the District of ten miles square, which was fixed upon for the permanent seat of the Government of the United States.

G. WASHINGTON, The House proceeded to the farther consideration of the amendments, proposed by the Senate, to the bill “apportioning Representatives among the People of the United States:" Whereupon,

Ordered, That the said amendments be committed to a Committee of the whole Ilouse immediatcly.

The House accordingly resolved itself into the said committee; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said amendments under consideration, and had disagreed to the first, and agreed to the last.

Ordered, That the consideration of the said report be deferred until to-morrow.
A message from the Senate, by Mr. Otis, their Secretary:

Mr. Speaker: The Senate have passed the bill for the relief of David Cook and Thomas Campbell, with several amendments; to which they desire the concurrence of this House. And then he withdrew.

The several orders of the day were further postponed until to-morrow.
And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14. Mr. Sedgwick, from the committee to whom were referred certain propositions of amendment to the Constitution of the United States, made a report; which was read, and ordered to lie on the table.

A petition of Susannah Taylor, late widow of Lieutenant William Houston, deceased, was presented to the House and read, praying to receive certain arrears of pay and clothing, due to her said husband, for his services as an officer of the Pennsylvania line, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Secretary of War, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

The House proceeded to consider the amendments proposed by the Senate to the bill, entitled “An act for the relief of David Cook and Thomas Campbell;" and the same, being twice read, were agreed to.

Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do acquaint the Senate therewith.

The House proceeded to consider the report of the Committee of the Whole House to whom were committed the amendments proposed by the Senate to the bill, entitled "An act apportioning Representatives among the People of the several States, according to their first enumeration:" Whereupon,

Ordered, That the said report and amendments be re-committed to the same committee immediately.

The House accordingly resolved itself into the said committee; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the

committee had, according to order, had under consideration the said report and amendments, to them re-committed, and made no amendment thereto.

The House then proceeded to consider the said amendments; and the first amendment being read, as follows:

Strike out the first section and substitute the following:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That, from and after the third day of March, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three, and until otherwise provided for by law, the House of Representatives shall be composed of members who shall have been chosen by the People of the several States, in the proportion of one Representative to every thirtythree thousand persons in each State, computed according to the rule prescribed by the Constitution of the United States--that is to say: From the State of New Hampshire, four members; the State of Massachusetts, fourteen; the State of Connecticut, seven; the State of Rhode Island, two; the State of Vermont, two; the State of New York, ten; the State of New Jersey, five; the State of Pennsylvania, thirteen; the State of Delaware, one; the State of Maryland, eight; the State of Virginia, nineteen; the State of Kentucky, two; the State of North Carolina, ten; and the State of Georgia, two members.”

A motion was made, and the question being put, to amend the said amendment, by, striking out, from the words “ several States to the end of the amendment, and inserting, in lieu thereof, the following words:

“In the number following, to wit:

"In the State of New Hampshire, five members; the State of Massachusetts, sixteen; the State of Connecticut, eight; the State of Rhode Island, two; the State of Vermont, three; the State of New York, eleven; the State of New Jersey, six; the State of Pennsylvania, fourteen; the State of Delaware, two; the State of Maryland, nine; the State of Virginia, twenty-one; the State of Kentucky two; the State of North Carolina, twelve; and the State of Georgia, two members :"

com:

SYeas............ 23,
It passed in the negative,

Nays ............ 37.
The yeas and nays being demanded by one-fifth of the members present,
Those who voted in the affirmative, are,
Fisher Ames,

Samuel Liverinore,
Egbert Benson,

Nathaniel Niles,
Elias Boudinot,

Cornelius C. Schoonmaker,
Shearjashub Bourne,

Theodore Sedgwick,
Abraham Clarke,

Jeremiah Smith,
Jonathan Dayton,

Israel Smith,
Elbridge Gerry,

John Steele,
Nicholas Gilman,

George Thatcher,
Benjamin Goodhue,

Thomas Tredwell,
James Gordon,

John Vining, and
William Barry Grove,

Jeremiah Wadsworth
Aaron Kitchell,
Those who voted in the negative, are,
Jobn Baptist Ashe,

Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg,
Abraham Baldwin,

William Vans Murray,
Robert Barnwell,

John Page,
Benjamin Bourne,

Josiah Parker,
John Brown,

Joshua Seney,
William Findley,

Upton Sheridine,
Thomas Fitzsimons,

William Smith,
William B. Giles,

Samuel Sterrett,
Samuel Griffin,

Jonathan Sturges,
Thomas Hartley,

Thomas Sumpter,
James Hillhouse,

Peter Silvester,
Daniel Huger,

Thomas Tudor Tucker,
Israel Jacobs,

Abraham Venable,
Philip Key,

Artemas Ward,
John W. Kittera,

Anthony Wayne,
Richard Bland Lee,

Alexander White,
Nathaniel Macon,

Hugh Williamson, and
James Madison,

Francis Willis.
Andrew Moore,

Vol. I.-60.

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