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In the HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

January 18th, 1790. The House took into consideration the report of the committee to whom was referred the resolution of the Congress of the United States, of the fourth day of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, proposing Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, viz:

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES: Begun and held at the City of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thou

sand seven hundred and eighty-nine. The Conventions of a number of the States having, at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added. And, as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the bene. ficent ends of its institution:

Resolved, By the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of Ame. rica, in Congress assembled, two-thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following articles be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, all or any of which articles, when ratified by threefourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid, to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution, viz: Articles in addition to, and amendment of, the Constitution of the United States of

America, proposed by Congress, and ratified by the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the fifth article of the original Constitution. Article the First. After the first enumeration, required by the first article of the Constitution, there shall be one Representative for every thirty thousand, until the number shall amount to one hundred; after which, the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall not be less than one hundred Representatives, nor less than one Representative for every forty thousand persons, until the number of Representatives shall amount to two hundred; after which, the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall not be less than two hundred Representatives, nor more than one Representative for every fifty thousand.

Article the Second. No law, varying the compensation for services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.

Article the Third. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the People peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Article the Fourth. Å well regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

Article the Fifth. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner; nor, in time of war, but in a manner prescribed by law.

Article the Sixth. The right of the People to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Article the Seventh. No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service, in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject, for the same offence, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled, in any criminal case, to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Article the Eighth. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right of a speedy and public trial, by an impartial Jury, of the State and District wherein the crime shall have been committed, which District shall have been, previously, ascertained by law; and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defence.

Article the Ninth. In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial, by jury, shall be preserved; and no fact, tried by a Jury, shall be otherwise re-examined, in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Article the Tenth. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

Article the Eleventh. The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny, or disparage, others, retained by the People.

Article the Twelfth. The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States, respectively, or to the People

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS MUHLENBERG,

Speaker of the House of Representatives. JOHN ADAMS,

Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate. Attest, Joan BECKLEY, Clerk of the House of Representatives.

SAMUEL A. Otis, Secretary of the Senate.
Which being read through, was agreed to : Whereupon,

Resołred, That this House do adopt the said several articles, and that they become a
part of the Constitution of the United States.
Resolved, That the resolutions be sent to the Senate for their concurrence.
By order of the House :
JACOB READ, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

In SENATE, January 19th, 1790.
Resolved, That this House do concur with the House of Representatives in the fore-
going resolutions.
By order of the Senate :

D. DE SAUSSURE, President of the Senate.

BY THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA.

UNITED STATES, June 11th, 1790. Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives :

I have directed my Secretary to lay before you a copy of the ratifications of the Amendments to the Constitution of the United States by the State of North Carolina ; together with an extract from a letter, accompanying the said ratification, from the Governor of the State of North Carolina to the President of the United States.

G. WASHINGTON. Extract of a Letter from his Excellency Alexander Martin, Governor of the State of North Carolina, to the President of the United States.

“ROCKINGHAM, May 25th, 1790. 812: I do myself the honor to transmit you, herewith enclosed, an Act of the General Assembly of this State, passed at their last session, entitled “An act to ratify the Amendments to the Constitution of the United States."

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA. His Excellency ALEXANDER MARTIN, Esquire, Governor, Captain General, and Com

mander in Chief in and over the said State.

To all to whom these Presents shall come : It is certified that the Honorable James Glasgow, Esquire, who hath attested the an nexed copy of an act of the General Assembly of this state, was, at the time thereof, and now is, Secretary of the said State, and that full faith and credit are due to his offiGiven under my hand, and the great seal of the State, at Danbury, the fourteenth day of February, Anno Dom. 1790, and in the 14th year of our Independence.

ALEXANDER MARTIN, (Seal appendant.) By his Excellency's command :

THOMAS ROGERS, D. Sec.

cial acts.

AN ACT to ratify the Amendments to the Constitution of the United States. Whereas the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, on the fourth day of March, did resolve, two-thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following articles be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, all or any of which articles, when ratified by three-fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid, to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution:

(Here follow the several Articles of Amendment, verbatim, as proposed by Congress to the Legislatures of the several States.)

Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the said Amendments, agreeable to the fifth article of the original Constitution, be held and ratified on the part of this State as articles in addition to, and amendment of, the Constitution of the United States of America.

CHA'S JOHNSON, S. S.

$. CABARRUS, C. H. C. Read three times, and ratified in General Asssembly, this 22d day of December, Anno Domini 1789.

STATE OF North CAROLINA. I, James Glasgow, Secretary of the said State, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true copy of the original act of the Assembly filed in the Secretary's office. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, this tenth day of February, 1790.

JAMES GLASGOW.”

UNITED STATES, June 11, 1790. I do certify the preceding to be a true copy of the transcript of the act transmitted to the President of the United States, by his Excellency Governor Martin.

TOBIAS LEAR, Secretary to the President of the United States.

BY THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS.

UNITED STATES, June 30, 1790. Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives :

An act of the Legislature of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, for ratifying certain articles as amendments to the Constitution of the United States, was yesterday, put into my hands ; and I have directed my Secretary to lay a copy of the same before you.

G. WASHINGTON. “By his Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esquire, Governor, Captain General, and Com

mander in Chief of and over the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

Be it known, That Henry Ward, Esquire, who hath under his hand certified the an. nexed paper, purporting an act of the General Assembly of the said State to be a true copy, is Secretary of the said State, duly elected, and engaged according to law. Wherefore unto his certificate of that matter, full faith is to be rendered. Given under my hand, and the seal of the said State, at Providence, this fifteenth day of June, A. V. 1790, and in the fourteenth year of Independence.

ARTHUR FENNER
By his Excellency's command :

Henry Warı, Secretary.
STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS.

In General Assembly, June Session, A. D. 1790. AN ACT for ratifying certain articles as Amendments to the Constitution of the United

States of America, and which were proposed by the Congress of the said States, at their session in March, A. D. 1789, to the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the fifth article of the aforesaid Constitution. Be it enacted by the General Assembly, and by the authority thereof it is hereby enacted, That the following articles, proposed by the Congress of the United States of America, at their session in March, A. D. 1789, to the Legislatures of the several States, for ratification, as Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, pursuant to the fifth article of the said Constitution, be, and the same are hereby, fully assented to, and ratified on the part of this State, to wit :

After the first enumeration required by the first article of the Constitution, there shall be one Representative for every thirty thousand, until the number shall amount to one hundred ; after which, the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall not be less than one hundred Representatives, nor less than one Representative for every forty thousand persons, until the number of Representatives shall amount to two hundred; after which, the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall not be less than two hundred Representatives, nor more than one Representative for every fifty thousand persons.

Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press ; or to the right of the People peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner ; nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

The right of the People to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated ; and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury ; except in cases arising in the land and naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger. Nor shall any person be subject, for the same offence, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb ; nor shall be compelled, in any criminal case, to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law : Nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and District wherein the crime shall have been committed, which District shall have been previously ascertained by law; and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him ; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor ; and to have the assistance of counsel for his defence.

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved : And no fact tried by a jury shall otherwise be re-examined in any court of the United States than according to the rules of the common law.

Excessive bail shall not be required; nor excessive fines imposed; nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the People.

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States, respectively, or to the People.

It is ordered, That his Excellency the Governor be, and he is hereby, requested to transmit to the President of the said United States, under the seal of this state, a copy of this act, to be communicated to the Senate and House of Representatives of the Congress of the said United States. A true copy, duly examined.

Witness, HENRY WARD, Secretary.

BY THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY.

UNITED STATES, August 6, 1790. Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives :

I have directed my Secretary to lay before you a copy of an exemplified copy of a law to ratify, on the part of the State of New Jersey, certain amendments to the Constitution of the United States ; together with the copy of a letter which accompanied the said ratification, from the Honorable Elisha Lawrence, Esquire, Vice President of the State of New Jersey, to the President of the United States.

G. WASHINGTON. VOL. 1.-40.

“BURLINGTON, August 4, 1790. SIR: I have the honor to transmit an exemplified copy of a law of the State of New Jersey, ratifying certain amendments to the Constitution of the United States. I have the honor to be, your most obedient, humble servant,

ELISHA LAWRENCE. The PRESIDENT of the United States." A true copy

TOBIAS LEAR, Secretary to the President of the United States.

“STATE OF NEW JERSEY. The Honorable Elisha Lawrence, Esquire, Vice President, Captain General and Com

mander in Chief in and over the State of New Jersey, and territories thereunto be, longing, Chancellor and Ordinary in the same:

To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting : These are to certify, that Bowes Reed, Esquire, whose name is subscribed to the annexed certificate, certifying the annexed law to be a true copy taken from the original enrolled in his office, is, and was at the time of signing thereof, Secretary of the State of New Jersey ; and that full faith and credit is, and ought to be due to his attestation as such. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name, and caused the great seal of the state of New Jersey to be hereunto affixed, at the City of Burlington, the third day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety, and of our Independence the fifteenth.

ELISHA LAWRENCE. By His Honor's command. Bowes REED, Secretary.

STATE OF New Jersey. AN ACT to ratify, on the part of this State, certain Amendments to the Constitution of

the United States. Whereas the Congress of the United States, begun and held at the City of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth day of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty; nine, resolved, two-thirds of both Houses concurring, that sundry Articles be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States as Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, all or any of which articles, when ratified by three-fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution:

And whereas the President of the United States did, in pursuance of a resolve of the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, transmit to the Governor of this state the Amendments proposed by Congress, which were by him laid before the Legislature for their consideration: Wherefore,

1. Be it enacted by the Council and General Assembly of this state, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the following Articles, proposed by Con. gress, in addition to, and amendment of, the Constitution of the United States, to wit:

(Here follow, verbatim, the first, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth Articles of the said Amendments proposed by Congress to the Legislatures of the several States.) Be, and the same are hereby, ratified and adopted by the State of New Jersey.

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY, November 19th, 1789. This bill having been three times read in this House, Resolved, That the same do pass. By order of the House:

JOHN BEATTY, Speaker.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, November 20, 1789. This bill having been three times read in Council, Resolved, That the same do pass.

By order of the House: WILLIAM LIVINGSTON, President.

CITY or BURLINGTON, STATE OF New JERSEY, August 3, 1790. These are to certify that the annexed law is a true copy, taken from the original, enrolled in my office.

BOWES REED, Secretary." I do certify the foregoing to be a true copy of an exemplified copy of a law transmitted to the President of the United States, by the Honorable Elisha Lawrence.

TOBIAS LEAR, Secretary to the President of the United States.

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