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Looks as his soul were searching out the way
To leave his body. Pardon me, that must
Break thro' thy last command; for I must speak :
You, that are griev'd, can pity; hear, my lord.

Phi. Is there a creature yet so miserable,
That I can pity ?

Bel. Oh, my noble lord,
View my strange fortune, and bestow on me,
According to your bounty (if my service
Can merit nothing) so much as may serve
To keep that little piece I hold of life
From cold and hunger.

Pbi. Is it thou? Be gone:
Go, fell those misbefeeming cloaths thou wear'st,
And feed thyself with them.

Beli Alas! my lord, I can get nothing for them: The filly country people think, 'tis treason 1. To touch such gay things.

Phi. Now, by my life, this is Unkindly done, to vex me with thy sight; Thou’rt falln again to thy diffembling trade : How shouldst thou think to cozen me again? Remains there yet a plague untried for me? Ev'n so thou wept'st, and look’dst, and spok'st,

when first I took thee up: Curse on the time! If thy VOL. III.

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Com

Commanding tears can work on any other,
Use thy old art, I'll not betray it. Which
Way wilt thou take ? that I may fhun thee; for
Thine eyes are poison unto mine; and I
Am loth to grow in rage. This way, or that way?

Bel. Any will serve. But I will chuse to have That path in chace that leads unto my grave.

[Exeunt severally.

Enter Dion and the Woodmen. Dion. This is the strangest sudden chance! You,

woodman ! Wood. My lord Dion.

Dion. Saw you a lady come this way on a fable horse, studded with stars of white ?

2Wood. Was she not young and tall ? Dion. Yes; rode she to the wood, or to the plain? 2 Wood. Faith, my lord, we saw none.

[Exeunt Wood. Dion. Pox of your questions then !

Enter Cleremont. What, is the found ?

Clere. Nor will be, I think. There's already a thousand fatherless tales amongst us; some say, her horfe run away with her; some, a wolf pursued her; others, it was a plot to kill her; and that

armed

armed men were seen in the wood : But, questionless, the rode away willingly,

Enter King and Thrasiline.
King. Where is the ?
Clere. Sir, I cannot tell.

King. How is that?
Sir, speak you where she is.

Dion. Sir, I do not know.

King. You have betray'd me, you have let me lose The jewel of my life: Go, bring her me, And fet her here before me; 'tis the king Will have it so. Alas! what are we kings? Why do you, gods, place us above the reft; To be serv'd, flatter'd, and ador'd, till we Believe, we hold within our hands your thunder; And when we come to try the pow'r we have, There's not a leaf shakes at our threatenings? I have finn'd,'tis true, and here stand to be punish'd; Yet would not thus be punish'd.

Enter Pharamond, Galatea, and Megrä.
King. What, is the found ?

Pha. No, we have ta'en her horse.
He gallop'd empty by; there is some treason :
You, Galatea, rode with her into th' wood;
Why left you her?

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Gal.

Commanding tears can work on any other,
Use thy old art, I'll not betray it. Which
Way wilt thou take? that I may fhun thee; for
Thine eyes are poison unto mine; and I
Am loth to grow in rage. This way, or that way?

Bel. Any will serve. But I will chuse to have That path in chace that leads unto my grave.

[Exeunt severally.

Enter Dion and the Woodmen. Dion. This is the strangest sudden chance! You,

woodman ! I Wood. My lord Dion.

Dion. Saw you a lady come this way on a fable horse, studded with stars of white ?

2Wood. Was she not young and tall ? Dion. Yes; rode she to the wood, or to the plain? 2Wood. Faith, my lord, we saw none.

[Exeunt Wood. Dion. Pox of your questions then !

Enter Cleremont. What, is she found?

Clere. Nor will be, I think. There's already a thousand fatherless tales amongst us; some say, her horse run away with her; fome, a wolf pursued her; others, it was a plot to kill her; and that

armed

Open once more those rosy twins, and send
Unto my lord, your latest farewell; oh, she stirs :
How is it, madam?

Are. 'Tis not gently done,
To put me in a miserable life,
And hold me there; I pray thee, let me go,
I shall do best without thee; I am well.

Enter Philaster, Phi. I am to blame to be so much in rage: I'll tell her coolly, when, and where I heard This killing truth. I will be temperate In speaking, and as just in hearing it. Oh, monstrous ! [feeing them.] Tempt me not, ye

gods! good gods, Tempt not a frail man! what's he, that has a heart, But he must ease it here?

Bel. My lord, help the princess.
Are. I am well; forbear.

Phi. Let me love lightning, let me be embrac'd
And kiss’d by scorpions, or adore the eyes
Of basilisks, rather than trust the tongues
Of hell-bred women! Some good gods look down,
And shrink these veins up! stick me here a stone,
Lasting to ages, in the memory
Of this damn'd act ! Hear me, you wicked ones!

You

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