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CONTENTS.

Mr. Ballou's birth, 33 ; Calvinism predominant, 33 ; milder forms of faith little

known, 36; vicinity of Boston, Universalists unknown, 38.

A. D. 1778 TO 1790.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION OF YOUNG BALLOU ; HE JOINS THE BAPTIST

CHURCH ; BECOMES A UNIVERSALIST; CAUSES WHICH INCLINED
HIM TO BE A PREACHER.

Religious education of young Ballou, 41 ; he seeks to understand Calvinism, 42;

Universalism takes its rise in his birth-place, 44 ; Elder Caleb Rich, 45; how Univer-
salism was regarded in Richmond, 46 ; Mr. Ballou's earliest opinions of it, 47 ; a
revival among the Baptists in R., 48 ; he joins the Baptist church, 49 ; discusses
Calvinism with the Universalists, 50 ; his own account of this matter, 52, 53 ; he is
thrown into doubt, 54 ; takes a journey to the State of New York, 55 ; interview with
the Baptist Elder Brown, 56 ; discussion concerning Rom. 5: 18, 67, 61; effect of

THE FIRST FIVE YEARS OF MR. BALLOU’S MINISTRY, DURING

WHICH HE ABANDONED THE DOCTRINES OF THE TRINITY, OF

ATONEMENT (IN THE FALSE SENSE OF THAT TERM), AND OF VICA-
RIOUS SUFFERING.

Mr Ballou is excommunicated from the Baptist church, but not from the church of

Christ, 69, 70 ; his first visit to the General Convention of Universalists, 71 ; his

first sermon, 72; on a second trial he nearly breaks down, 73 ; subject of the first

discourse, 74 ; sentiments of Universalists at the time he commenced to preach, 75–

77 ; progress that had been made by Universalists up to this time, 78 ; account of

Mr. Ballou's seniors in the ministry, as Adam Streeter, Caleb Rich, John Murray,

Thomas Barnes, Noah Parker, Elhanan and Moses Winchester, Shippie Townsend,

Rev. John Tyler, Matthew Wright, Noah Murray, Zebulon Streeter, George Rich-

ards, Joab Young, William Farewell, Michael Coffin, David Ballou, Dr. DeBenneville,

Richard Clarke, 80–84 ; Mr. Ballou's first doubts in regard to the Trinity, 85; gen-

eral view of the first five years of his ministry, 86—88; disparity between Universal-

ists and their opponents at that time, 88–91 ; Mr. B.'s early travels as a clergyman,

92; his doubts on the Trinity and the common view of Atonement increase, 93 ; he

becomes a scriptural and somewhat controversial preacher, 95 ; his doubts concerning

the Trinity and Atonement further increase, 96 ; his acquaintance with the Univer-

salists of Hardwick and vicinity, 99; his success and the matter of his teachings, 102 ;

his first acquaintance with Elhanan Winchester, 104 ; his unsolicited ordination, 105 ;

he renounces the Trinity and kindred doctrines, 107; he avows himself a believer in

the strict unity of God, 111; Unitarianism scarcely known then in America, 112 ;

Rev. Dr. Freeman, 113 ; testimony of Rev. Edward Turner, 115; influence of Mr.

B.'s views on Universalists, 115 ; slander of Rev. A. Latham, 117; General Conven-

tion of 1795 and 1796, 118 ; Mr. B.'s marriage, 119; character of his wife, 120, 121.

FEBRUARY 1803 TO SEPTEMBER 1809.

MR. BALLOU’S MINISTRY AND LABORS IN VERMONT.

A cluster of Universalists, 169; Universalist preachers in Vermont in 1803, 171 ;

Mr. Ballou's ordination in Vermont, 172 ; Convention of 1803, 173; Mr. Stacy's

account of it, 176—179 ; Convention of 1804, 179 ; other denominational matters, 181;

letter from Caleb Keith, 182 ; Mr. Ballou's reply, 183; he writes his Notes on the

Parables, 184 ; views taken therein, 186; his disadvantages, 189; commences to

write his Treatise on Atonement, 190 ; testimony to its effects, 191, 192 ; an aggres-

sive work, 194 ; plan thereof, 195; of sin, 196 ; non-freedom of the will, 197; sin

may have endless results, 202 ; anecdote of the two stacks of hay, 205 ; false systems

of atonement, 206 ; doctrine of the Trinity exploded, 207 ; true view of Atonement,

210 ; person of the Mediator, 212 ; nature of Atonement, 215; consequences thereof,

216 ; results in Universalism, 218 ; transport of Mr. Ballou, 218 ; proofs, 219–226 ;

conclusion of the treatise, 227 ; general remarks thereon, 233 ; Rev. Lemuel Haynes,

236 ; Mr. B. in Haynes' pulpit, 238 ; Haynes' sermon, 239 ; Mr. Ballou's reply, 241–

251 ; Mr. Haynes writes a feeble letter, 251; Convention of 1805, 252 ; ordination of

Rev. A. Kneeland, 253 ; Convention of 1806, 255 ; Mr. Ballou's official visit to cen-

tral New York, 257; Mr. Stacy's account, 258 ; visit to New York in 1807, 260 ; Rev.

S. R. Smith (then a very young man) first hears Mr. Ballou, 263 ; Convention of 1807,

267

i the Convention Hymn-book, 269–276 ; Convention of 1808, 276 ; reminiscence

concerning the ordination of Rev. S. Streeter, in 1808, 277 ; Mr. Ballou has a contro-

versy with Rev. I. Robinson, 279—302 ; writes the Candid Review, 282; dedication

at Salem in 1809, 302 ; Mr. Ballou's standing when he left Vermont, 304 ; at the head

of the Universalist clergy, 305—307 ; was the only man who kept the devil out of

Barnard, 308 ; Convention of 1809, 308.

Mr. Ballou proposes to remove from Barnard to Portsmouth, N. H., 314 ; his first
duties there, 315, 316 ; Rev. J. Buckminster addresses him, 317–321 ; Mr. Ballou
replies, 321–326; his teachings from the pulpit, 326 ; teaches a school, 328 ; Rev. J.
Walton admonishes him by epistle, 329—333 ; Mr. Ballou replies, 333–341 ; reply
further continued, 341—347 ; Mr. Ballou's closing letter, 347 ; Did you entreat me as
a brother ? 349 ; I entreat you as a father, 348—350 ; Mr. Ballou as a pastor at
Portsmouth, 351 ; a new association, 353 ; the Gospel Visitant, 354 ; review of a

Efforts of Portsmouth society to retain Mr. Ballou, 405–407 ; the society at Salera
claim his services, 407—109; his pastoral labors in Salem, 409; Mr. Ballou at the
funeral of Rev. John Murray, 410 ; his controversy with Rev. John Kelley, 412 ; cor-
respondence with Mr. Abner Kneeland, 414 ; sermon on rich man and Lazarus, 415 ;
letter to Rev. Brown Emerson, 415 ; controversy on future punishment with Rev.
Edward Turner, 415, 416 ; Conventions of 1814, 1815, 1816, 416 ; effects of the contro
versy on future punishment, 417 ; Mr. Ballou invited to Boston, 418; natural division
of the biography and close of volume one, 420.

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ences.

The name of Hosea Ballou is very widely known. For many years he preached the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ. Brought to the knowledge of the truth in early manhood, he consecrated all the powers he possessed, through a long, eventful and laborious life, to its diffusion among men.

His soul was passive to its influHe knew no other will but the will of his divine Master. He was the son of a clergyman; and was brought up to respect and love religion from his earliest days. Following sincerely the dictates of his conscience, he united himself at first to the Baptist church, of which his amiable and excellent father had been the pastor; but, as he advanced in the knowledge of the holy Scriptures, and reasoned more closely on divine things, his

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