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quired. It was earnestly recommended to those, who could not conscientiously bear arms in any cafe, to contribute liberally to the relief of their distressed brethren and to do all other services to their oppressed country, which they could consistently with their religious prinçiples. They alio proposed that each colony should appoint a committee of fafety, to direct all matters necessary for the security of their respective colonies, in the receis of their allemblies and conventions; and fhould make such provision by armed vessels or otherwise, as might be judged expedient, for the protection of their harbours and navigation on their fea coasts, against all hoftile cutters and fhips of war. . ..

This being the day appointed for the continental fast, 20 congress agreed to meet, and go in a body to divine service, both parts of the day. They requested Mr. Duché to preach before them in the morning, and Dr. Allifon in the afternoon. But before service, they met time enough to read some dispatches brought by express from general Schuyler ; and a letter from the conven ţion of Georgia, setting forth that that colony had acceded to the general affociation, and appointed delegates to attend the congress,

The day was kept at Philadelphia, as the most folemn fast ever held in that city. It was religiously observed throughout the united colonies.' The united fynod of New York and Philadelphia, had published a pastoral letter fome time before : it was read on that day, in the churches under their care, which are very numerous. They said in it, « As the whole continent, with hardly any exception, feem determined to defend their rights by force of arms, it becomes the pe

liation, We are willing to treat on such terms as can
alone render an accommodation lasting; and we flatter
qurselves, that our pacific endeavours will be attended
with a reinoval of ministerial troops, and a repeal of
those laws, of the operation of which we complain, on
the one part, and a disbanding of our army, and a dif-
solution of our commercial associations on the other.”
They, after that; insinuated the danger the inhabitants
of Britain would be in of losing their freedom, in cafe
their American brethren were fubdued. The address
is intended to conciliate the minds of the inhabitants of
Britain, to the measures that the colonists have already
taken, or may be obliged further to take, and to obtain
the countenance of the former. w
- The petition to the king, the address to the inhabi-
tants of Great Britain, and the letter to the lord mayor,
&c. were ordered to be sent under cover to Richard
Penn, esq; whom the president was to request, in behalf
of the congress, to join with the colony agents in pre-
senting the petition to the king. - Mr. Penn failed four
days after this order for England,

The congress'agreed upon appointing commiffioners to superintend Indian affairs in behalf of the colonies,

Proper talks to the Indians were ordered to be prepared, 13. which were reported the next day, and accepted. . 36. The congress resolved to recommend to all able-bo

died effective men in each colony, between sixteen and fifty, immediately to form themselves into regular companies of militia ; to acquire military skill, and to be well prepared for defence; and that a fourth part of the militia in every colony be selected for minute mén, and be ready to march wherever their asistance may be required. It was earnestly recommended to those, who could not conscientiously bear arms in any case, to con-. tribute liberally to the relief of their distressed bretliren and to do all other services to their oppressed country, which they could consistently with their religious prinçiples. They also proposed that each colony should appoint a committee of fafety, to direct all matters neçessary for the security of their respective colonies, in the recess of their assemblies and conventions; and should make such provision by armed veffels or otherwise, as might be judged expedient, for the protection of their harbours and navigation on their sea coasts, against all hoftile cutters and fhips of war.. . . :

This being the day appointed for the continental fast, 20 congress agreed to meet, and go in a body to divine fervice, both parts of the day. They requested Mr. Duché to preach before them in the morning, and Dr. Allifon in the afternoon. But before service, they met time enough to read some dispatches brought by express from general Schuyler ; and a letter from the convenţion of Georgia, setting forth that that colony had acceded to the general affociation, and appointed delegates to attend the congress,

The day was kept at Philadelphia, as the most folemn faft ever held in that city. It was religiously obferved throughout the united colonies.' The united fynod of New York and Philadelphia, had published a pastoral letter fome time before: it was read on that day, in the churches under their care, which are very numerous. They said in it, « As the whole continent, with hardly any exception, feem determined to defend their rights by force of arms, it becomes the pe

culiar duty of those, who profefs á willingness to hazard their lives in the cause of liberty, to be prepared for death, which to many must be a certain, and to every one is a possible or probable event. It is well known to you (otherwise it would be imprudent thus publicly to profess) that we have not been instrumental in inflaming the minds of the people, or urging them to acts of violence and disorder. Perhaps no instance can be given on fo interesting a fubject, in which political sentiments have been so long and so fully kept from the pulpit, and even malice itself has not charged us with laboring from the press; but things are now come to such a height, that we do not wish to conceal our opinions as men. Suffer us therefore to exhort you, by assuring you, that there is no army so formidable as those who are superior to the fear of death. . Let therefore every one who, from generosity of spirit, or benevolence of heart, offers himself as a champion in his country's cause, be persuaded to reverence the Lord of Hosts, and walk in the fear of the Prince of the kings of the earth; and then he may, with the most unshaken firmness, expect the issue either in death or victory." .....

After several other exhortations, they offered fix advices, in substance as follows: “ ist. Let every opportunity be taken to exprefs your attachment to king George and the revolution principles. We recommend esteem and reverence for the person of the prince, who has probably been mined into the late and present mea: furès by those about him ; neither have we any doubt, that they themselves have been in a great degree deceived by false information from interested persons residing in America.--2dly. Be careful to maintain the union

which at present subfifts in all the colonies, on which the success of every measure depends.-- zdly. We earnestly befeech all societies to watch over their members, and discourage luxury of living, public diversions, and gaming of all kinds.-4thly. We recommend a regard to public order and peace; that all persons conscientiously pay their debts, and to the utmost of their power serve one another, so that the 'evils inseparable from a civil wàr may not be augmented by wantonness and irregularity.- 5thly. We recommend to all ranks, but particularly to those who may be called to action, a spirit of humanity and mercy. We recommend that meekness and gentleness of spirit which is the noblest attendant on true valor. That man will fight most bravely, who never fights but when it is necessary, and who ceases to fight as soon as the necessity is over. Lastly, We would recommend to all societies, not to content themselves with attending devoutly on fasts, but to continue habitually in prayer, and to have frequent voluntary meetings for folemn intercession with God on the important trial.”

The accession of Georgia, was owing much to the exertions of the reverend Dr. Zubly; who roused the attention of many in the province to the alarining fituation of American affairs ; fo that at length a general election was held for delegates to fit in provincial congress. They met on the fourth of July in Savannah; and requested the governor to appoint a day of fafting and prayer through the province, that a happy reconciliation right foon take place between America and the parent state, and that, under the auspicious reign of his majesty and his descendants, both countries might re

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