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general Howe, who issued one proclamation, condemn- 1975. ing to military execution such inhabitants as attempt to quit the town without a written licence, if detected and taken; if they escape, they are to be proceeded against as traitors, and their effects are to be forfeited : and another, declaring that if such as are permitted to de-.. part, attempt carrying away more than five pound in specie, to which fum they have been restrained for some time past, they shall forfeit the whole fum discovered, : beside suffering fine and imprisonment. .'

Congress having intimated to general Washington, that an attack upon Boston was much desired, a council of war was called, but unanimously agreed that it was 18 not expedient, at least, for the present. On the fame : day captain Mowar destroyed 139 houses, and 278 stores and other buildings, the far greatest and best part of the town of Falmouth in the northern part of the Maf- . sachusetts. The inhabitants, in compliance with a rem: folve of the provincial congress to prevent tories carry- : ing out their effects, gave some violent obstruction to the loading of a mast ship, which drew upon them the indignation of the admiral. . Captain Mowat was difpatched in the Canceaux of fixteen guns, with an armed large ship, schooner and 'sloop. After anchoring toward the evening of the seventeenth, within gun shot, he sent a letter on shore, giving them two hours for the removal of their families, as he had orders to fire che town, they having been guilty of the most unpardonable rebellion." A committee of three gentlemen went on board, to learn the particular reasons for such orders. He anfwered, that his orders were to set on fire all the feaports between Boston and Halifax; but agreed to spare.

1775. the town till nine o'clock the next morning, would they

consent to send him off eight small arms; which was immediately done. : The next morning the committee applied afresh; he concluded to spare the town till he could hear from the admiral, in case they would send him off four carriage guns, deliver up all their arms, ammunition, &c. and four gentlemen of the town as hostages. That not being complied with, about half past nine he began to fire from the four armed vessels, and continued it till after dark. With shells and carcases, and about thirty marines whom he landed, he fet the town on fire in several places. About a hundred of the worst houses escaped destruction, but suffered damage. The inhabitants got out a very considerable part of their furniture, and had not a perfon killed or wounded, though the vessels fired into the town about three thousand shot, beside bombs and carcases. General Lee reprobates their cowardice, in admitting such a paltry party to land with impunity, and set their town in flames, when they had at least two hundred fighting men, and powder enough for a battle. In the private letter, wherein he expressed these sentiments, he made no mention of the failors being repulfed with the loss of a few men ; though this might happen in the close of the day, and give occasion for its being related by others. The burning of Falmouth fpread an alarm upon the sea-coast, but produced no disposition to submit to the power and mercy of the armed British agents. The people in common chose rather to abandon the sea-ports that could not be defended, than quit their country's çause ; and therefore removed back, with their effects, to a safe distance..

. The congress, the latter end of September, concluded 1975 upon fending a committee of three members to confer with general Washington and the governor of Conneco ticut, the lieutenant governor of Rhode Ifland, the council of Massachusetts, and the president of the convention of New Hampshire and others, touching the most effectual method of continuing, supporting and regulating a continental army. They met and agreed on the measures to be pursued. Dr. Franklin being one of the committee, the Massachusetts general court embraced that opportunity of ordering the treasurer to pay oz. him 18541. sterling, in full for his late services as agent, 23. from October 31, 1770, to March 1, 1775. You may recollect. that governor Hutchinson alway' refused figning the grants made him by the house of assembly. The doctor might have liked specie at the time such grants were made, better than the present paper money; but his foresight will undoubtedly transform the latter into some solid substance: he had to pay 100l. of it back into the hands of a committee, appointed to wait upon him within a day or two, being the amount of a sum sent by feveral persons from England, for the relief of those Americans who were wounded in the battle of Lexington, and of the widows and children of those who were then Nain, .. .

The old fouth meeting house, a large handsome brick , building, well fitted up without and within, was taken possession of and destined for a horse riding school, and the service of the light dragoons. It is said and be lieved, that an offer was made of building a complete riding fchool for less money than it would cost to remove the pews and the side galleries (the front remains for

1775. the town till nine o'clock the next morning, would they

consent to send him off eight small arms; which was
immediately done. : The next morning the committee
applied afresh; he concluded to spare the town till he
could hear from the admiral, in case they would send
him off four carriage guns, deliver up all their arms,
ammunition, &c. and four gentlemen of the town as
hostages. That not being complied with, about half
past nine he began to fire from the four armed vessels,
and continued it till after dark. With shells and car-
cases, and about thirty marines whom he landed, he fet
the town on fire in several places. About a hundred of
the worst houses efcaped destruction, but suffered da-
mage. The inhabitants got out a very considerable
part of their furniture, and had not a person killed or
wounded, though the vessels fired into the town about
three thousand shot, beside bombs and carcases. Ge-
neral Lee reprobates their cowardice, in admitting such
a paltry party to land with impunity, and set their town
in flames, when they had at least two hundred fighting
men, and powder enough for a battle, In the private
letter, wherein he expressed these sentiments, he made
no mention of the sailors being repulfed with the loss of
a few men; though this might happen in the close of
the day, and give occasion for its being related by others,
The burning of Falmouth fpread an alarm upon the
fea-coast, but produced no disposition to submit to the
power and mercy of the armed British agents. The
people in common chose rather to abandon the sea-ports
that could not be defended, than quit their country's
cause; and therefore removed back, with their effects,
to a safe distance.

· The congress, the latter end of September, concluded 17756 upon fending a committee of three members to confer with general Washington and the governor of Connec. ticut, the lieutenant governor of Rhode Ifand, the council of Massachusetts, and the president of the convention of New Hampshire and others, touching the most effectual method of continuing, supporting and regulating a continental army. They met and agreed on the measures to be pursued. Dr. Franklin being one of the committee, the Massachusetts general court ema braced that opportunity of ordering the treasurer to pay on him 18541. sterling, in full for his late services as agent, 23. from October 31, 1770, to March 1, 1775. You may recollect. that governor Hutchinson alway' refused figning the grants made him by the house of assembly. The doctor might have liked specie at the time such grants were made, better than the present paper money; but his foresight will undoubtedly transform the latter into some solid substance : he had to pay 100l. of it back into the hands of a committee, appointed to wait upon him within a day or two, being the amount of a sum sent by several perfons from England, for the relief of thofe Americans who were wounded in the battle of Lexington, and of the widows and children of those who were then Nain. . .

The old south meeting house, a large handsome brick 27 building, well fitted up without and within, was taken poffeffion of and destined for a horse riding school, and the service of the light dragoons. It is said and believed, that an offer was made of building a complete riding school for less money than it would cost to remove the pews and the fide galleries (the front remains for

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