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gative in Ireland” (Dublin Chronicle). I made PRAYER OF MARY QUEEN OF Scots.-
this note in the library of the Royal Dublin

" O Domine Deus,
Society; it may be worthy of a corner in “N. & Q."

Speravi in te.
I do not know whether any published pedigree of

O care mi Jesu,

Nunc libera me. our distinguished Premier notices this namesake

Languendo, gemendo of his.

C. S. K.

Et genuflectendo
Kensington, W.

Adoro, imploro

Ut liberes me.” A New Year's Gift. - The custom of express- Some years ago a clerical friend of mine, since, ing esteem, respect, or affection by the interchange alas ! dead, repeated this musical prayer to me, of new year's gifts was, two hundred years ago, saying it was composed by the fair Queen of Scots even more universal than now; nor was it con- during her captivity. It would be interesting to fined to individuals

, for corporate bodies sought to know when and where her sad heart spent itself in obtain or keep the good will of noblemen and other such a despairing outburst as is expressed in these persons of influence in their city, borough, or

touching and beautiful words. county by sending to them at this season rich

W. F. Marsh JACKSON. gifts of wine, sugar, &c., or, what was more useful,

OLD SAYING. a purse of gold. Thus we find the Corporation of

"They say. What say they? Let them say. Leicester-as may be gathered from the chamber

Aiunt.

Quid aiunt ? Aiant. lains' accounts--very frequently sending new year's Such are the well-known English and Latin forms; gifts to the lord lieutenant of the county, to but Mr. R. Hill, writing from Bournemouth to the members of the Grey family at Bradgate, to the Guardian of Nov. 27, 1878, gives what has Hastings family at the Abbey of Leicester, and to hitherto been wanting, the Greek version : others. The practice, however, so far as the members of the Corporation of Leicester were con

Λέγουσιν ά θέλουσιν cerned, could hardly be called an interchange of

Λεγέτωσαν. . civilities, as it was almost entirely a one-sided This, he adds, is often found on rings and an

E. T. M. WALKER. matter—that is, they gave but seldom received. tiques. However this rule, like all others, had its excep

Oxford Union tion, as the following will show : On Jan. 1, 1610-11, Mistress Elizabeth Haslewood presented the following note, supplied by a correspondent

BILL FOR HANGING AND BOILING A FRIAR.– to the town two corslets, one pike, a musket, a sword, and a dagger, which she sent by her to the Kentish Observer, may be worth preserving

in “N. & Q.": serving-man to the hall on New Year's Day. Having presented the gift of his mistress he was “In the present age of religious tolerance and high rewarded with a donation of five shillings for his price of labour the following may not be uninteresting.

It is extracted from an old magazine, and is an authentic trouble, and the mayor (Master Thomas Parker) copy of a document of the date : Account of the banging and his brethren, wishing to express their appre- and parboiling of Friar Stone at Canterbury in 1539. ciation of Mistress Haslewood's courtesy and Paid for half a tod of timber to make a pair of gallows liberality, sent as a new year's gift “a runlett of for to hang Friar Stone, 2s. 6d.; to a carpenter for wyne and one suger lofe,” which cost together 31s. making the same gallows and the dray, 1s. 4d. ; to a

labourer that digged the holes, 3d.; other expenses of It would seem that the two corslets were not new setting up the same, and carriage of the timber from ones, for they were dressed and trimmed at the Stablegate to the dungeon, 1s.; for a hurdle, 6d.; for a cost of 16s., after which, frames having been set load of wood, and for a horse to draw him to the dun. up in the parlour of the Town Hall, they were geon, 25, 3d.; paid two men that sat at the kettle and hung up there-witnesses to the martial and parboiled him, 18.; to three men that carried bis quarters

to the gates and sat them up, ls.; for halters to hang patriotic spirit of Mistress Elizabeth Haslewood.

him, and Sandwich cord, and for screws, 1s.; for a Thomas North, F.S.A. woman that scowered the kettle, 2d.; to him that did SEVERE WINTERS.–Under the above title a

execution, 3s. 8d.; total, 14s. 8d."

W. D. PINK. writer in the City Press, 1st inst., states, I know Leigh, Lancashire. not on what authority, that the year 1487 witnessed an unusual degree of frost in Flanders, AN ANCIENT Pair of Boots.-It may interest where it is said that wine was dealt out to the army some of the readers of “ N. & Q.” to learn that in in blocks chopped up with a hatchet. If this state- a shop nearly opposite the Liverpool Street Station ment is really authentic, it affords a singular cor- may be seen a huge pair of cavalry boots, I believe roboration to Virgil, who, in describing a severe of the seventeenth century, and perhaps of the winter in England, says :

period of the civil wars. The boots are in the “ Cæduntque securibus humida vina." most excellent preservation, and are made of the

Georgic iii. 364, thickest hide (lined and padded), with very thick Hampstead, N.W. E. WALFORD, M.A. soles, and large rowelled spurs attached by steel

chains. The upper portions are of rounded leather In all other parts of the poem I have followed to cover the knees and most of the thighs. The the exact rhythm or metre, giving all the weibliche boots bear the maker's name, and the place “Paris,” or double rhymes, and have also endeavoured to and seem scarcely to have been worn at all. They copy the metallic ringing of such passages as are said to weigh ten pounds each. I suspect that “ Denn mit der Freude Feier klange" they are unique in this country for their age and (and wherever else the bell appears to be tolling). complete state of preservation. It was stated For in Schiller's great poem the sound is of high erroneously in a newspaper last year that these

importance.

Geo. COLOMB, Col. R.A. boots were discovered in an old house at Clerkenwell. Their true history is as follows : Upon BAD GRAMMAR. — As a pendant to the recent opening a walled-up_cupboard in the ancient discussion in your columns on the phrase “Between building of Bagshot Park, Surrey, about the year you and I,” let me draw attention to the following 1837, there was found in it a large quantity of old anecdote about the equally ungrammatical but armour and accoutrements. Among them were most common expression “It's me," taken from these boots, which were given to the steward of Fraser's Magazine, 1872 :the estate, a Mr. Ravenscroft. They were care- “The beautiful Miss Port, her grand-niece and adopted fully kept by his family, and are now owned by child, sitting one day writing in Mrs. Delany's drawing, his son. I am indebted to the present Mr. Ravens- room, heard a knock at the door: she of course inquired croft for allowing me to examine the boots and for Who's there?' It's me,' replied a man's voice, somethis history of them. H. W. HENFREY.

what ungrammatically; but grammar appears to have

been much disdained in our great-grandmothers' days. CHAUCER’S PRAISE.— Anthony Nixon, in his We may stay where he is,' answered Miss Port, on which

the knocking was repeated. • Me is impertinent, and Christian Navy, Wherein is playnely described may go about his business,' reiterated the lady; but the the perfit course to sayle to the Hauen of Eter- unknown party persevering in a third knock, she rose to nall happinesse. London, Simon Stafford, 1602,” ascertain who was the intruder, and, to her dismay, quotes the description of Hypocrisy in the Englisht found it was no other than King George himself that she Romaunt of the Rose (v. 13-14, 1. 413-448, edit. All she could utter was 'What shall I say?' Nothing

had been unwittingly addressing with so little ceremony. Morris),

at all,' replied his Majesty; you was very right to be “ Another thing was done they write,"

cautious who you admitted.' This royal disregard of to

grammar seems to have furnished a precedent for that “They leesen God, and eke his raigne,"

of the Court and of society in general.” and sets before and after this, the following stanzas :

It may be added that Miss Port, the heroine of " Which Image here I would describe to thee,

the above anecdote, afterwards married Mr. BenBut that long since it hath been paynted playne

jamin Waddington, a Monmouthshire squire, and By learned Chaucer, gemme of Poetry,

that her daughter is the present Lady Llanover. Who past the reach of any English brayne :

E. WALFORD, M.A. A folly therefore were it here for me,

Hampstead, N.W.
To touch that he did often vse to say,
Writ in the Romaunt of his Roses gay.

“WESSEL,” “WESLEY,” OR “VESSEL” Cup.Thus hath the golden pen of Chaucer old,

I see that Mr. Tuiselton Dyer, in his interesting

note on “Christmas in England” (5th S. x. 483), The Image playne described to the eye, Who passing by long since, did it behold

speaks of a "wesley-bob” or “ vessel-cup” as if it And tooke thereof aduisedly,

were no longer customary in the neighbourhood of And left the same to bis posterity,

Leeds. I can testify that in Wakefield it is still That each man passing by, might playnely know

quite common for children to go from house to The perfit substance of that flattring show." Sig. F 4, back, and G.

house with a box-often a fancy soap-box or suchF. J. F.

like representative of the stable or manger, retain

ing its original inscription, &c., on the inside of SCHILLER'S “Song of the Bell.”—The North the lid — lined with coloured paper, and about half German Gazette having done me the favour to com- filled with evergreens, on which repose three dolls mend my translation of Lenore for following both | in ordinary dolls' costume, but supposed to reprethe sense and sound of the original, I wish to sent Mary, Joseph, and the Babe; red-cheeked remark as to my translation of the Song of the apples, oranges, &c. (I think I have Bell, which was a more arduous task, that I have “ crackers "), are also put in. The children call failed in one instance to follow exactly the metre the whole affair a “ wessel-cup” or “wessel-bob,” of Schiller's original. I found myself beaten by and exhibit it from house to house, where they the couplet,

announce themselves by singing, to its proper « Thiere wimmern

tune, the charming old traditional carol, “Here we Unter Trümmern,"

come a-wesseling among the leaves so green," and was obliged to render it by the single line, which is, I think, in Bramley and Stainer's collec“ Beasts beneath the ruins moan."

tion.

seen

I regret to say that in these days of school-board THE ELECTRIC Light.-At the present moment "education " the children have often but a very it may not be uninteresting to note that the electric imperfect knowledge of what they mean by this light was patented in London in the winter of service beyond the collecting of pence, and they 1848-9. An account of it will be found in the sometimes give very odd answers if catechized. Illustrated London News for January, 1849 (p. 58). For instance, I have known one of the dolls de- The notice ends with a remark to the effect that scribed as

“ Tichborne.” I am not sure that the “all hope of an extensive application of the electric term "wessel” is generally understood. It is, of light must now be abandoned ; but we shall still course, a form of “wassail,” and probably derived rejoice if it can be employed as a special mode of from a custom of drinking healths (“Wæs hæl”) illumination on great public occasions." from house to house, There is an interesting

E, WALFORD, M.A. notice of the custom in Machyn's Diary (1555-6): Hampstead, N.W. "The xij even wag at Henley a.pon Temes a mastores

THE BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ARCHERY.-To the series Lentall wedow mail a soper for master John Venor and ys wyff, and I and dyver odur neybors; and as we wher of lists under the above heading you may be at soper, and or whe' liad supt, ther cam a xij wessells, willing to add the title of a little book which has with maydens syngyng with ther wessells, and after cam come into my possession relating to a county the cheyff wyffes syngyng with ther wessells; and the society of the last century, of which a very aged gentyll-woman bad hordenyd a gret tabull of bankett, relative of mine, now deceased, was a member in dyssy3 of spyssys and frut, as marmelad, gynbred, gele, comfett, suger plat, und dyver odur.” --Camden early youth. The book bears this title :-“ReguSoc., xlii. 99.

lations for the Union Society, established at Har“Wessells” is explained in the note as “visors, low in 1790.” The regulations conclude with the or masques.”

J. T. F. following :-“ That the arms of the society be the Winterton, Brigg.

arms of the counties of Essex and Herts united. ISAIAH XXII. 18.—“He will surely violently turn crescent ; motto, “Archery, freedom, and love.'”

Supporters, a bowman and cricketer; crest, a and toss thee like a ball into a large country.” Many On the rose-coloured cover of the little book are have, no doubt, wondered much as to what could depicted two shields with the arms of the counties, be the physical fact intended by this simile, as crest above and motto below, while the supporters they heard the above passage read in church on the exhibit two stalwart gentlemen, one in kneemorning of Monday, the 2nd ult. I used to wonder breeches bearing a båt, the other in high boots and myself till I was a witness to the sight. I was in feather-crowned hat grasping a bow. the island of Mitylene during a great storm of

The society was limited to fifty ladies and fifty wind in winter. There is a plant, not unlike

gentlemen, and a president and lady president was wormwood, which grows into a compact globular appointed for each meeting. The list of members form, with very stiff' stalks and branches. In winter reads very much like a racing card, as each ludy it dies down to the ground, and in its dry and and gentleman assumed two or more colours, and light condition is torn from its roots by the wind, each seems to have adopted two fanciful French and set bounding over the wide and unenclosed designations, described as mottos.” country. I have seen five or six of these coursing

I do not know whether you will think this along at once-a vivid emblem of a man at the record of the pastimes of a century ago worth mercy of a higher power, helpless to choose his adding to the "notes." I should be happy to send own course, or even to find rest. Plautus has, the list of the “ names and colours" of the members “Dii nos quasi pilas homines habent,” but this should you or any of your readers desire it. refers to the game of ball.

C. L. E. LEATON BLENKINSOPP.

[For “ The Bibliograpby of Archery" see “N. & Q.," AN HISTORICAL SLEDGE.— The following is 5t1's. ix. 324, 383, 442; x. 102. ] taken from a Times telegram dated

Geneva, STROUD, GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— There is certainly Dec. 30," printed in the Times of December 31, a great want of a “Handbook to Stroud and the 1878:

neighbourhood,"containing what a visitor to the “During the late severe weather, wheeled carriages being almost useless, the demand for sledges was so great place, anxious to become acquainted with its that many ancient vehicles, which had not seen the light history and topography, would desire to have before for the greater part of a century, were brought into him. There is nothing of the kind to assist one in requisition, and the identical bledge, gaily painted, and his researches in this highly picturesque and imits sides etill ornamented with victorious eagles, in which portant district. I am well acquainted with the Napoleon rode from Martigny to Bourg St. Pierre when late Mr. Fisher's Notes and Recollections of Stroud he was preparing to cross the Alps before the campaign of Marengo, was seen daily driven about the streets of (1871); but the volume is too expensive for the Lausanne. This interesting relic is now the property of purpose in view, and, besides, it is"" out of print " a Vaudois voiturier, who lets it out for hire."

and not easily procured. A small sized book, with H. W. H.

a good map or two and a few illustrations, would

66

5th S. XI. Jax. 11, '79.]

NOTES AND QUERIES.

2

THE ELECTRIC LIGHT.-At the present moment

8 mastores

hool-board
out a very it may not be uninteresting to note that the electric
in by this light was patented in London in the winter of

and they 1818-9. An account of it will be found in the
catechized. Illustrated London News for January, 1849 (p. 58).

dolls de- The notice ends with a remark to the effect that
e that the "all hope of an extensive application of the electric

It is, of light must now be abandoned ; but we shall still
Ty derived rejoice if it can be employed as a special mode of
es hiel") illumination on great public occasions."
nteresting

E. WALFORD, M.A.
13:33-6): Hampstead, N.W.

The BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ARCHERY.–To the series
l'enor and
* we wher of lists under the above heading you may be
j vessel's

, willing to add the title of a little book which has
after cam come into my possession relating to a county
: and the society of the last century, of which a very aged

bankett, gynbred,

relative of mine, now deceased, was a member in -Camden early youth. The book bears this title :-" Regu.

lations for the Union Society, established at Har“visors, low in 1790.” The regulations conclude with the T. F. following :-"That the arms of the society be the

arms of the counties of Essex and Herts' united.

Supporters, a bowman and cricketer; crest, a
ntly turn crescent ; motto, 'Archery, freedom, and love."
..” Many on the rose-coloured cover of the little book are
hat could depicted two shields with the arms of the counties,
imile, as crest above and motto below, while the supporters
ch on the exhibit two stalwart gentlemen, one in knee-
o wonder breeches bearing a bat, the other in high boots and
I was in feather-crowned hat grasping a bow.

The society was limited to fifty ladies and fifty
ot unlike gentlemen, and a president and lady president was
, globular appointed for each

meeting. The list of members In winter reads very much like a racing card, as each lady ts dry and and gentleman assumed two or more colours, and

the wind, each seems to have adopted two fanciful French unenclosed designations, described as “ mottos.”,

be most acceptable to many, and I doubt not, from and, after premising that the illustrations were what I have heard, would prove a remunerative children, continues : “The prints were, there undertaking. But, unlike too many publications made from spirited designs, but did not preten of the class throughout the kingdom, it should be high finishing in the execution.” Now who strictly accurate in details, and not calculated in nished these “ spirited designs," and who engr any way to mislead the reader.

ABABA, them? The above extract rather favours the

that the designer and engraver were not the s

person. Queries.

ENGLISH ENGRAVERS. I have recently obta (We must request correspondents desiring information on family matters of only private interest, to affix their a book of 100 pages containing engraved cip names and addresses to their queries, in order that the The title-page is missing, but it contains a re answers may be addressed to them direct.]

mendation signed by the following engra

Thomas Atkins, George Bickham, Charles B Who ILLUSTRATED LAMB's “TALES FROM John Bell, Bernard Baron, Claude Bosc, SHAKESPEAR"?-Bohn's Lowndes says “fourth Bosquain, Emmanuel Bowen, John Burton, F edition, with twenty plates by William Blake, Burgh, Isaac Basire, William Caston, James 1822." The catalogues of the best informed book- James Cole, Benjamin Cole, Maximilian sellers at the present day refine upon this, and Henry Collins, Richard Cooper, Thomas describe the plates as designed by Mulready and John Clause, John Carwithan, John I engraved by Blake. Is there any authority for William Dugood, Thomas Evans, John I either statement ? Gilchrist, in his Life, does not Henry Fletcher, Pa. Fourdrinier, Thomas Gan enter the Tales in his list of Blake's engravings. Charles Gardner, John Gilbert, John H Lowndes is also inaccurate in limiting the twenty Joseph Halshide, William Hulett, Richard plates in question to the fourth, when they accom- thro, Joseph Howel, Edward Hill, John H papy the earlier editions of the Tales.*

Andrew Johnston, Elisha Kirkall

, Giles Now, Godwin was the publisher of the Tales ; Thomas Long, Charles Moore, Andrew and Blake, we know, illustrated, in 1791, Mary Thomas Pingo, John Pine, Richard Perry, Is Wollstonecraft's Original Stories from Real Life. Parbury, Samuel Parker, Thomas Plåt, Charles Lamb, moreover, thought highly of Blake's Pelham, William Pennock, Thomas Ra artistic merit. Therefore it is likely enough that Bishop Roberts, John Raven, James Re Blake may have had more or less to do with these John Sturt, Josephus Sympson, William St illustrations; but I would gladly learn the extent Jacob Skinner, Mich. Shilburn, Chris. S of his co-operation, and where the fact of his or James Sartor, John Symon, John Smith, Mulready's employment on these designs is re-Smith, Robert Smith, William Henry corded. "None of the plates, unluckily, are signed ; George Thornton, Gerd. Vandergucht, Jon and, to complicate the matter, they vary in merit dergucht, William Pritchard, John Clark. so much that one would almost suspect the em- seventy-two names. ployment of two different engravers. For instance,

I find very few of these names in Sp it is difficult to ascribe to the same artist the fine Dictionary, which, though an American plate of "Nic Bottom and the Queen of the lation, professes to give all the facts to be Fairies ” (which is quite Blakian) and the woodeny in previous books. I would ask, therefore, “ Gratiano and Nerissa desire to be married.” date of the publication of this book, and se Excepting this last, the ten plates of the first whether this list

been used as a me volume are much superior to the ten plates of the identifying or tracing English engravers. second, in which the Othello, Comedy of Errors, this opportunity also to inquire again if an and Hamlet illustrations are perhaps the worst is known of the Peter Pelham mentioned Blake could hardly have engraved so slovenly and See “ N. & Q.,” 4th S. xii. 118, 179. unanatomical a skull as the gravedigger is holding.

W. H. WITN The “Advertizement to the Second Edition” in

Boston, U.S.A. some measure apologizes for these shortcomings ; WHAT IS THE EXTENSION OF RETE CON * The bibliography is rather involved. Concurrently of Charles I., occurs the following phrase,

In a Court roll of the manor of Bibury, seco with this illustrated edition" for young persons peared a plain edition “for the library," with merely a presentant (Juratores) quod inhabitantes de frontispiece of Shakspeare, engraved by T. Woolnoth non habent nec utuntur rete Corvil ide after Żoust. Of this library edition the first impression fecerunt.” What is the extension of Rete appeared in 1807, the second in 1809, the third edition and why did they forfeit for not using it ? 1816. pression, 1807 (this I have not seen, but the ''Advertize. add they suffer the same penalty for not us ment to the Second Edition " establishes its existence); and arrows, or “Sagittar," as the roll has i the second in 1808; the third, 1816; fourth, 1822.

E.

storm of

se coursing I do not know whether you will think this
man at the record of the pastimes of a century ago worth
choose his adding to the potes.I should be happy to send
autus bas,/ the list of the "names and coloursof the members
," but this should you or any of your readers desire it.

C. L.
SINSOPP.

[For “The Bibliograpby of Archery" see “N. & Q.,"
Zlowing is 5el S. ix. 324, 383, 412; x. 102.]
Geneva,

STROUD, GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— There is certainly
cember 31,

a great want of a “Handbook to Stroud and the

neighbourhood," containing what a visitor to the
ed carriages place

, anxious to become acquainted with its
een the light | history and topography, would desire to have before
brouglit into him. There is nothing of the kind to assist one in
painted, and his researches in this highly picturesque and im-
kles, in which portant district. I am well acquainted with the
· Pierre when

late Mr. Fisher's Notes and Recollections of Stroud
the campaign
the streets of (1871); but the volume is too expensive for the
pe property of purpose in view, and, besides, it is " out of print

and not easily procured. A small sized book, with
a good map or two and a few illustrations, would

H

TTY

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DALLAWAY'S “JOURNEY FROM RODBOROUGH TO amongst Sir William's MSS. in the Brit. Mus., por
GLOUCESTER,” &c.--About the year 1790 the Rev. in T. C. D. Library, nor in the Royal Irish
James Dallaway - "he had great abilities, but Academy, nor in the Royal Dublin Society.
was pedantic and satirical”-wrote his Journey

C. S. K.
from Rodborough near Stroud to Gloucester, with Kensington, W.
a Description of the Country and an Account of
the Cathedral. Where can I see it? A MS.

“THE LAST OF THE IRISH BARDS.”—To whom

copy was in the possession of Mr. Delafield Phelps, of does this designation properly belong ? Certainly Chevenage House, as appears from his privately not to Carolan, though one may see in St. Patrick's printed Collectanea Gloucestriensia (London, 1842). Cathedral, Dublin, a fine bas-relief of this gifted

АвнВА.

harpist, which was executed in Rome at Lady

Morgan's expense by Hogan, a son of the wellTRADESMEN'S TOKENS. --Akerman, Burn, and known sculptor, and bears the following inother authorities say that the issue of these was scription :prohibited by a proclamation of Charles II. on

“By the desire of Lady Morgan. Aug. 16, 1672 :

To the memory of
"And all persons, who should after the 1st day of

Carolan,
September make, vend, or utter any other kind of pence,

The last of the Irish Bards.
halfpence, or farthing, or other pieces of brass, copper,

Obiit A.D. MDCCXXXVII.; or other base metal, other than the coins authorized above,

Ætatis suæ An. LXVIIr.' or should offer to counterfeit any of His Majesty's half. A meeting of Irish pers was held in Belfast pence or farthings, were to be chastised with exemplary in 1792, when many of the old harpers attended, severity."

and astonished their hearers by the display of their Now, I have a considerable number of tokens, skill in ancient Irish music.

ABABA. especially of Kent, Sussex, and the Cinque Ports, bearing dates of the latter part of the eighteenth Varia.-Can any one kindly tell me, from century. I have not been able to find any work that personal knowledge alludes to tokens of a later date than the seven- 1. Where is a catalogue of esquires and gentleteenth century except the Numismatic Chronicle, men of Yorkshire (R. Gascoign ; Sims, p. 328) to which speaks of some issued in Ireland as late as be found ? the first part of the present century.

2. Where can the account of the family of Ogle, Will some one kindly say whether the issue of privately printed, Edin., 1812 (Sims, p. 268), be these tokens went on for more than a hundred seen ? years in spite of proclamations, or was there any 3. What lists of the royal household in the relaxation of the law on the subject? Or to what reigns of Hen. VI., Edw. IV., Rich. III., and author can I refer? CLARRY. Hen. VII. are there which can be consulted ?

T. W. CARR. LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL."-In Harold's

Barming Rectory, Maidstone.
Lay (canto vi.) these two lines occur :-
" And each St. Clair was buried there,

Miss ANNE BORLEBOG, the oldest actress that With candle, with book, and with knell." ever appeared on any stage, died at Charleston, Was the latter line ever corrected by Scott ? North America, in 1827, aged eighty-eight. She Surely he must have written “with book, with made her debut fifteen years before Garrick, as candle," &c. He could not have meant to lay Queen Katharine in Henry VIII. She continued stress on with and and. Yet in all the edition i to represent the younger class of matrons until she have at hand I find the passage printed as I have was seventy-eight, and she was sixty-six before quoted it.

JAYDEE. she gave up playing the misses in their teens. Is

there a published history of her life ? “MOKE” OR “Moak."--MR. T. BIRD says

GEORGE ELLIS, (5th S. x. 521) that he has heard a donkey called St. John's Wood. in Essex and Herts a bussock. In Devonshire a donkey is generally called a moke. Is this name

LAURENCE EUSDEN, POET LAUREATE FROM 1718 common in other parts of England ?

TO 1730.-I want the date of his birth. In R. E. WALFORD, M.A.

Bisset's edition of the Spectator, 1793, it is said Hampstead, N.W.

that Eusden died on Sept. 27, 1730, at his rectory, [The term is common in London.]

Conningsby, Lincolnshire; but the present rector

of that parish finds no record of his residence or MS. HISTORY OF FERMANAGH COUNTY.--This services there, nor of his burial in the churchyard. History, compiled by the Rev. Dr. Samuel Biographical details of this writer are scanty, and Madden, of Waterhouse, co. Fermanagh, circa apparently very unreliable. I should be glad of 1720, was in the possession of the late Ulster, Sir any information about him. Wm. Betham, Where is it now? It is not

WALTER HAMILTON,

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