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CLXXXIX.-MR. WILLIAM HARBORD TO THE EARL of Essex.

15 Dec. 1674. + + + + +

To-morrow I intend to see Ranelagh; on Thursday next my Ll of Pembroke is to be married to my Lady Portsmouth sister; I heare that Brock makes great brags to King what services he could doe him in Ireland; & that King the other night at supper jeered him with it, & spoke very kindly of you ; I have desired Sec. Covent to discourse with Kg. about Parl. & I am in hopes that if Ran. be homest wee shall prevaile, for the Trear. seemes forward in't but they are slippery men; Its wonderfull to see how bold Trear. is in making emmemies, depending wholy on his credit with King, wo" all people wonder at, he having seem so many effects of Kg. his incomstancy; its evident that he hath much to doe to support the publike eapense, & talks of Parl. as if he intended it, but God knowes his hart, though if there be no peace the Kg. will take good measures, I beleeve, saye or doe what they can, for the Frenche sinke a pace; I feare they will buy peace at any rate; you see in the Diurnall the story of Butnett a priest; Duke hath prevailed to have him only banished wo" giving great discontent; I believe Ranelagh hath brought over some new projects wo him, & that Trear will renew the Farme ere long; for he lays about him on all hands where there is any the least project of gaine.

CXC.—MR. WILLIAM HARBOBD TO THE EARL OF Essex.

MAY IT PLEASE Y" ExCeLLENCY, 19 Dec., 1674, London. This morning Mr. Hilliard brought me y' Ld" of y" 30 of Nov". I wish I had receaved y” sooner Ran. having been in Towne ever since Tuesday, & Hillyard came wo him; though I every day watched him at Kg. Duke their rising, & have daily an acco how he spends his time, & where. He seems extreamly faire, but I confesse of all the men of the world I am the most affraid to Trust him, & just now coming from him he told me he was going to Lodd. for Instructions to Forbese; & why such things should be directed to him & not to Essea doth startle me. This morning Ld. Burlington came to me on the behalf of Orrery, having heard that I had receaved the report from Essex about the Lapse mony; I receaved him very civilly, & told him that it was not come to my hands. He told me that great endeavours were used to possesse King that Essex desired to be called home as weary of that post ; I confesse it startled me & filled me w” jealousies that Ran. might contrive that way to wound Esser with King; & wooin a Minute after he was gone St John Nicholas came to me & told me the same thing, whereupon I thought it best to speake to King of the contents of y" Letter & then to settle y' affaire woo him; & reading it over 3 or 4 times & finding nothing int but what would be gratefull to him & also let him see y, pains Essea tooke to serve him; I resolved to reade it to him, wo". I did, & on every distinct clause did to the best of my understanding argue the weight & prudence of Essee his opinion and advice. He harkend to it wo" great patience & satisfaction, & after I had donne I told him of the report I had heard; he said he had not heard one word of it, but that he was so satisfied w” Essea, his conduct, & how zealously he studied to serve him, that he bid me assure Essex that it was not in the powr of any man to create any unkindnesse between King & Essea, then between Kg. & Duke, & bid Essea depend of it; & that he would write you word so suddenly himselfe. I got this opportunity by Elliott, & King, finding that Duke followed us into the bedchamber, he went into the further room & looking behind him shut the door after us staying till I was past, and, having observed that he is entreamly pleased that Essex doth apply himselfe to him & y he thinks him fitter to be trusted w' a Secrett then them, I make the best use I can of it, & omitt no care to doe Essex all the service I can if Ran. be honest I believe wee shall have parliament; at my going from home he went away & left Duke Treas. & divers others, woo I could perceive Duke did not expect.

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CXCI.—WILLIAM HARBord To THE EARL of Essex.

MAY IT PLEASE Y" ExcellENCY, - 22 Dec : '74. + + % + +

On suhday night last, Kg: being at supper at Trea., Harry Savel" being very drunck, fel so fowly on Ld: Molgrave, that Kg: commanded Savel to be gonne out of his presence. However, the meat day Mollgrave sent him a challenge by Ld: Middleton ; Rochester was to the other side. There was moe harm dome ; but D. hath interessed himselfe & prevailed w” Kg: to forbid Savel his presence. Ram., every time I meete him, askes me when I goe for Ireland. I doe wish I was wo y Excellency during yo time y! So Henry intends to staye here, wo" wilbe for a neare 2 monthes after y” Holydayes; but I am apt to thinke that Trea. & Ran. will renew the farme suddenly, & I would not be away them. If I finde after Christmas that they doe not presse it, I will perhaps take post & come over, but If I doe suspect their Designe to be such, then I will differr it.

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* Henry Saville.

CAMD. SOC. 2 O A VOL. I.

CXCII.—SIR HENRY CovenTRY TO THE EARL OF Essex.

MY LP White Hall, Dec. 22nd, '74. Your Exclicy of the 12th of Dec'er I have r", and have shewn it his Majo. Before I sent the letter I told his Majo I did beleeve it maight bee the same booke which I had seene & was públiquely sold heere, and I do beleeve it is no other. The truth is it had no greate effect here, for those y' were Papists would not beleeve such bloody acts of theyre own tribe, & those y' were not had hardly faith enough to beleeve all the apparitions and legend-like storys in it, so seemed to goe off heere w! very little noyse. Wee have little news heere. The Earle of Pembrook was on Saturday last marryed to the sister of the Dutchesse of Portsmouth. L" Chiefe Justice Vaughan this day buryed, & the Earle of Clarendon his Corpse every day expected to bee buryed at Westminster. The march of Mon" de Turenne hath not as yet produced so greate effects as they expected in France, some part about Lorraine. I beleeve hee hath recovered, but I doubt will hardly bee in a capacity to force the Confederates to passe the Rhyne, as they seemed once to hope in France. No place for treaty as yet agreed upon. Breda offered by the Kg of France, totally rejected by the Confederates, and Hamburgh, proposed by the Emperor, refused by him. Both sides talk much of peace, but prepare for warre, especially the Emperour. The Suedes have not yet attempted any act of hostility upon the Elector of Brandeburgh, but hath a good army in Pomerania, and hath sent au Embassy to Denmarke to endeavour the keeping y' Kg: in quiett,

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who I doubt is too fast allyed woo the Emperour & Holland, and is too mindfull of the losses his father made by the Swedes to let goe such an opportunity of revenge as theyre making a warre ag" the Empire (for so it is now called) would give him. I have not further to trouble y' Excello then wo the presentation of my reall desires to serve you, &c.

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Lord Chambellain & Ossery are not yet returned, but being every howre expected.

CXCIII.-WILLIAM HARBORD TO THE EARL OF ESSEX.

MAY IT PLEASE Y” ExcellENCY, 24 Dec. '74. I gave you an account by yo Tuseday post of my having receaved yo Excellencies sent me by Mr. Hilliard, & likewise y' other of y" 12 instant, & what had past between Kg: & my self upon that occasion, since wo" Treas : Did appoint Ran: & me to attend him, w" wee did but to no purpose till yesterday morning, & then in such hast that he spoke to us severelly. What he said to Ran: 1 Juniow not, it being in ye bed-chamber; but I found Ran: cast his eye often towards me as if he seemed affraid that I should overheare him, & though in my nature I am not apt to be jealous, yet I can not but be so of him. After Trea ; had donne woo Ran: he called me to him & told me that he had severall things to saye to me ; the first that Kg had at his first acquainting him wo my desires consented to it, & was pleased to saye to him that he was very well satisfyed w” my services, & would in time doe better for

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