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* In this chapter the author gives an account of the political flate of Europe. His observations are delivered with his usual spirit of humour and severity. He appears most particularly affected with the proceedings of the courts of judicature, and complains of being almost ruined by a chancery-suit, which was determined in his favour with rofts. It must be confessed, that instances of this kind are too frequent in our courts of justice; and they leave us no room to boast of the execution of our present laws, however excellent the laws, in their own original foundation, may have been, judgement, when turned inte wormwood, is bitter; but delays, as Lord Bacon observes, turn it into vinegar. It becomes sharp and corroding: and certainly it is more elgible to die immediately by the wound of an enemy, than to decay lingering by poison, administered from a seeming friend. Orrery. The noble commentator is mistaken as to his first observation; for Gulliver has here given a political account of no country but England. It is however a mistake to which any commentator would have been liable, who had read little more than the titles or contents of the chapters, into which this work is divided; for the word Europe has, in some English, and all the Irish editions, been printed in the title of this chapter, instead of England. Glumdalclitch.

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