Three Faces of Power

Capa
SAGE, 1990 - 264 páginas
Broadly defining power as the ability to get what we want, this volume - new in paper - identifies three major types of power: threat power, which is particularly important in political life; economic power, which derives from the power to produce and exchange goods and depends on the changing distribution of property ownership; and integrative power, which rests on relationships such as love, legitimacy, respect, affection, community and identity. Boulding argues that threat power should not be seen as fundamental since it is not effective unless reinforced by economic and integrative power.

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Conteúdo

About the Author
6
Acknowledgments
7
Introduction
9
The Nature of Power
15
Power as a Social Structure
35
The Objects of Power
52
The Pathologies of Power
65
Personal Destructive Power
79
Organizations for Destruction
140
Economic Power in Organizations
155
Organizations for Integrative Power
171
The Dynamics of Organizational Power
187
Power in Physical and Biological Evolution
202
Power in Societal Evolution
216
Power and the Future
236
Index
251

Personal Economic Power
95
Personal Integrative Power
109
The Dynamics of Personal Power
124
Using Three Faces of Power as a Textbook
258
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Sobre o autor (1990)

Kenneth Boulding is one of the most prolific, provocative, and highly regarded economists of our time. Born in England in 1910, he received his M.A. at Oxford University and moved to the United States in 1937. Since then he has authored or coauthored over two dozen books and has taught at a number of leading universities. Currently he is affiliated with the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado. In an early essay, "Is Economics Necessary?" Boulding argued that economics is important not merely as it relates to the marketplace but because it is a part of virtually all other human activities. Many of his works are extensions of this theme. As a result, his writings cover an astonishing variety of topics, including ecology and religion. His pioneering efforts to apply economic concepts to the areas of social conflict, peace, and disarmament have established him as one of the founders of the school of conflict resolution. Boulding's early work, Economic Analysis (1941), is regarded as a classic overview and survey of the field. Many of his other works, including A Reconstruction of Economics (1950) and Conflict and Defense (1962), were once required reading for graduate students in economics. Others, such as Beyond Economics (1968) and Economics as a Science (1970), are collections of shorter essays covering such diverse topics as politics, social justice, and ethical problems, and are intended for a broader audience. The Image (1956), a theory of human behavior based on perceptions of the world, has received critical praise from all quarters and is perhaps his best-known work among noneconomists. Boulding has received nearly every significant award or recognition in the field of economics, and he has been the recipient of 25 honorary degrees from universities around the world. In his spare moments, he enjoys poetry, sketching, and watercolor painting.

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