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Come your ways, come your ways [come along,' come hither with me ") Tr. & Cr., iii. 2. - Look to't, I charge you : come your ways.-Hamlet, i. 3.

Well, go thy way (* go along with thee,' “pursue thine own way']: thou shalt not from this grove,

till I.-Mid. N, D., ii. 2. Well, go thy way [' be off with thee,'' be gone,'' I give thee thy way ']; if Sir Toby would leave drinking, thou.—Tw. N., i. 5.

Go thy way ['go on thine own way,' 'thou know'st well what thou 'rt about '). Hector ! There's a brave man : . Go thy way, Troilus, go thy way !-Tr. & Cr., i. 2.

Go thy ways, wench; serve God.-R. & Jul., ii. 5.

Say'st thou so, old Jack; go thy ways; I 'll make more of thy old body than I have done.—Merry W., ii. 2.

Go thy ways, old Jack; die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be not forgot.—1 H. IV., ii. 4.

Ay, go, your ways, go your ways ['go away,'' go along with you ']: I knew.As You L., iv. I.

God amend us, God amend! we are much out o' the way [' strayed from rectitude, or the right path '].-Love's L. L., iv. 3.

He draws Mark Antony out of the way [' apart,'' away'].-Jul. C., iii. 1.

A pox of drowning thyself ! it is clean out of the way ['out of the question, 'away from the purpose '].-Oth., i. 3.

I 'll devise a mean to draw the Moor out of the way [' apart,' 'away '], that your converse and business.-Ibid., iii. 1.

Is 't lost? is 't gone? speak, is it out o' the way? [' mislaid ').-Ibid., iii. 4.

But at fourscore it is too late a week [' too late a period of time,'“too late an epoch, 'too late by at least a week.' See · Too dear a halfpenny,” previously cited).As You L., ii. 3.

She 'll burn a week longer [' at least a week longer,'“a good portion of time longer '] than the whole world.-Com. of E., iii. 2.

Well be with you ["I wish you well,' 'good wishes to you '], gentlemen ! Hamlet, ü. 2.

If the sins of your youth are forgiven you, you're well to live [' you will live well, ' you will be fortunate to live '].-W. T., iii.

3.
Well said ! ['well done '] thou look'st cheerly.—As You L., ii. 6.
Spread, Davy; spread, Davy: well said, Davy.—2 H. IV., V. 3.
-Well said, my hearts !-R & Yul., i. 5.
Come, give me that: this way; well said.-Ant. & C., iv. 4.

What said he ? How looked he ? Wherein went he ? [* In what clothes was he dressed).-As You L., iii. 2.

And he went still in this fashion [' was always dressed in this style '], colour, ornament.Tw. N., iii. 4.

Jove sometime went disguis'd [' was disguisedly attired '], and why not 1?2 H. VI., iv. I.

Never lack'd gold, and yet went never gay [' never dressed gaily '].-Oth., ii. 1. And thane of Cawdor too ; went it not so ? [* did not the prediction run thus').Macb., i. 3.

When three or four of his blind brothers went to it [' were killed,' went to death.' 'went to destruction '].-Two G. of V., iv. 4.

He shall conceal it, Whiles you are willing it shall come to note, What time [' at which time,' . when '] we will our celebration keep.—Tw. N., iv. 3.

An thou canst not smile as the wind sits [* according to the mood that pleases thy superiors '], thou 'lt catch cold.Lear, i. 4.

Is 't possible? Sits the wind in that corner? [' does the air of her favour blow in that direction,' is this the state of affairs '].-M. Àdo, ii. 3.

Though my reason sits in the wind against me [i blows me in the contrary direction,' *advises me to a different course'l.--Ant. & C., iii. 8.

There is something in the wind [there is something going forward,' «there is something adverse threatening '], that we cannot get in.--Com of E., iii. 1.

By this same coxcomb that we have i? the wind ["we have got the wind of,'' got the upper hand of'; also, we have got scent of,' on whose track we are').All's W., m. 6.

He knows the game: how true he keeps the wind ! [' maintains the advantage he has gained,'' pursues the track he is on'].—3 H. VI., iii. 2.

Why do you go about to recover the wind of me? [' take advantage of me'].Hamlet, iii. 2.

It keeps on the windy side [' on the safe side,' 'on the side protected from the wind,' * on the advantageous side ’] of care.-M. Ado, ii. 1.

Still you keep o' the windy side of the law: good.--Tw. N., iii. 4.

Brown, madam: and her forehead as low as she would wish it [* lower than she could wish it to be ').-Ant. & C., iii. 3.

So will you wish on me [invoke curses upon me'], when the rash mood is on.-Lear, ii. 4.

0, a good wish upon you ! ['may you have your wish '].--As You L., i. 3. Exceeding those that I can wish upon thee [* invoke upon thee '].-R. III , i. 3. I will wish him [' recommend him '] to her father.Tam of S., i. 1.

I would not wish theril to [í aspire after for them,' • desire for them '] a fairer death. -Macb., v. 7.

When man was wish'd to ['enjoined to,' • desired to'] love his enemies !—Timon, iv. 3.

Bringeth sensible regreets—to wit [' that is to say,' be it known'], (besides commends, and courteous breath), gifts of rich value !-Mer. of V., ii. 9.

Diest; or, to wit, I kill thee, make thee away.-As You L., V. I.
To wit, no female should be inheritrix in Salique land.-H. V., i. 2.
To wit, an indigested and deformed lump.—3 H. VI., v. 6.
But 'tis no wit [' unwise '] to go.—R. & Ful., i. 4.

Witness [* as may be attested by '] our too much memorable shame, when Cressy battle.-H. V., ii. 4.

You appeared to me but as a common man; witness the night, your garments, your lowliness.-Ibid., iv. 8.

Witness the hole you made in Cæsar's heart.- }ul. C., v. i.
-Witness this army, of such mass and charge.-Hamlet, iv. 4.

Woe, woe are we [* most grieved are we.' See OATHS, EXCLAMATIONS, &c.], sir, you may not live to wear.--Ant. & C., iv. 12.

Hob, nob, is his word [' is his decree']; give 't or take 't.—Tw. N., iii. 4. That is done too, sir; only cover is the word ['the determined fact,' the decreed thing,' the definitive sentence'].—Mer. of V., iii. 5.

Slaying is the word ; it is a deed in fashion.—7 ul. C., v. 5.
If they suffer our departure, death 's the word.Ant. & C., i. 2.
Hanging is the word, sir; if you be ready for that.-Cym., V. 4.
Pardon's the word to all.-Ibid., v. 5.
Coupe le gorge! That is the word. I thee defy again.-H. V., ii. 1.
The word is, “ Pitch and pay"; trust none.-

-Ibid., ii. 3.
The word is, mildly: pray you, let us go.—Coriol., iii. 2.

Now have I done a good day's work [* accomplished a good deed.' See " Made good work," previously cited].-R. III., ii. 1.

How earnestly are you set a' work [ urged to act '], and how ill requited !Tr. & Cr., V. II.

My son profits nothing in the world [ whatever ') at his book.—Merry W., iv. I. I do nothing in the world but lie.—Love's L. L., iv. 3.

6

And it is nothing, nothing in the world.Mid. N. D., V. I.
He hath no interest in me in the world.-As You L., v. i.
I will choose mine heir from forth the beggars of the world [' in chief,' . in especial,'
paramount, most notorious '].—Timon, i. 1.
The beauty of the world ! the paragon of animals !-Hamlet, ii. 2.

I therefore apprehend and do attach thee, for an abuser of the world ( pre-eminent,' * unparalleled '; and also implying' of mankind,' of the public'), a practiser of arts inhibited.-Oth., i. 2. (See “A woman of the world,” previously cited, for an idiom formerly in use.)

Seeming! I will write against it [' denounce it,' protest against it'].-M. Ado, iv. I,

I'll write against them [- denounce them,' 'protest against them'], detest them, curse them.-Cym., ii. 5.

I'd give bay Curtal and his furniture,
My mouth were no more broken than these boys',

And writ as little beard [“ subscribed or confessed to owning as little beard,' 'gave tokens of possessing as little beard '].-All's W., ii. 3.

I must tell thee, sirrah, I write man [' give evidence of the right to be called a man,' show that I am worthy to be styled a man,' 'proclaim myself to be a man '); to which title age cannot bring thee.-Ibid., ii. 3.

Observe his inclination in yourself ["in your own person,' by your own observations '].—Hamlet, ii. 1.

Shakespeare uses some idiomatic terms of number :-
A brace of [' two’] draymen bid God speed him well.-R. II., i. 4.
And I .. have lost a brace of kinsmen.-R. & Ful., v. 3.
I have not a case of [' three ʼ] lives.-H. V., iii. 2.
A couple [' two'] of Ford's knaves, his hinds.—Merry W., iii. 5.
Have ta'en a couple of as arrant knaves as any in Messina.-M. Ado, iii. 5.
I am sworn brother to a leash of [' three '] drawers.1 H. IV.,

That you three fools lack'd me, fool, to make up the mess [' the four ').Love's L. L., iv. 3.

A mess of [' four '] Russians left us but of late.-Ibid., v. 2.
Where are your mess of [' four '] sons to back you now. -3 H. VI., i. 4.
Here comes a pair of ['two '] very strange beasts.-As You L., V. 4.
Here justified by us, a pair of kings.-W. T., v. 3.
Made a pair of [ a set of,'' a flight of'] stairs to marriage.—As You L., V. 2.
And a pair of [' a set of '] stocks in the town ?-Com. of E., iii. 1.
I'll make a fat pair of [- set of ') gallows.--1 H. IV., ii. 1.
Than the length and breadth of a pair of [' a set of'] indentures?-Hamlet, v. I.

I yet am unprovided of a pair of [* a set of '] bases ... thou shalt have my best gown to make thee a pair.--Per., ii. 1.

Shakespeare uses several idioms of elliptical expression :-
(Be gone] about it: you know where to find me.—2 H. IV., i. 2.
[Hasten] after, Aumerle! Mount thee.-R. II., V. 2.
And he to England shall [go) along with you.-Hamlet, iii. 3.
Thou shalt not (go] back, till I have borne.- 7ul. C., iii. 1.
Let Romeo (depart] hence in haste.-R. & Jul., iii. 1.
Early to-morrow will we rise, and [go] hence.-Jul. C., iv. 3.
I will [go] from hence to-day.-Cym., i. 2.
Say she 'll [go] home to her father.—Cym., iii. 2.
I'll [go] through Glo'stershire.—2 H. IV., iv 3.
I'll (go) to the king, my master, that is dead.-Ibid., v. 2.
I'll not (go) to Rome, I'll [go] back with you.-Coriol., v. 3.
Menas, I'll not (go] on shore.--Ant. & C., ii. 7.

ii. 4

I'll willingly [go] to him: to gain his colour.-Cym., iv. 2.
By this sun that shines, I'll [go] thither.Ibid., iv. 4.
I'll [have] no more drumming; a plague of all drums !-All's W., iv. 3.
I'll have) no swaggerers no, I'll [have] no swaggerers.2 H. IV., ii. 4.
No; I'll [have] no Anne Bullens for him.-H. VIII., iii. 2.
No, I'll (have) nothing; for if I should be brib’d too.Timon, i. 2.
[Let us go] in to my tent, the air is raw and cold.-R. III., v. 3.
Shall we (go) in? I'll keep you company—Timon, i. 1.
Good nuncle (go), in, and ask thy daughter's blessing.-Lear, iii. 2.
Thither I must (go), although against my will.—Com. of E., iv. I.

You must fight] no more.—Tr. & Cr., iv. 5.
I must (go) to England; you know that ?-Hamlet, iii. 4.

I must go to the watch.--Oth., ii. 3.
On mine own accord I 'll [go] off.-W. T., ii. 3.
(Go) on, Bardolph; lead the men away.—2 H. IV., iii. 2.
I will (go) on with my speech in your praise.Tw. N., i. 5.
Or shall we (go) on, and not depend on you ?-Jul. C., iii. 1.
Please it your grace, [go] on to the state affairs.-Oth., i. 3.
Thither shall it (go), then: and happily may.-Yohn, v. 7.
[Away, be gone] to the church: take the priest.Tam. of S., iv. 4.
(Let us proceed] to this gear-the sooner the better.—2 H. VI., i. 4.
Achilles will not (go) to the field to-morrow.-Tr. & Cr., ii. 3.
Pray you, let 's (go) to him.-Coriol., iii. 1.
Let's go] to our affairs. Forgive us our sins !-Oth., ii. 3.
If you have any music that may not be heard, (set) to't again.-Ibid., iii. 1.
If we compose well here we will undertake the expedition], to Parthia.– Ant. & C., ii. 2.
He shall (go) to Parthia.-Ibid., ii. 3.
He purposeth (to go to Athens : whither, with what haste.-Ibid., iii. 1.
(Go] to the sea-side straightway: I will possess you.Ibid., iii. 9.
(Go) to him again: tell him he wears the rose of youth.-Ibid., iii. 11.

(Hasten] to the monument!... To the monument! . . . To the monument ! Ibid., iv. 11.

(Let me repair) to the trunk again, and shut the spring of it.-Cym., ii. 2. (Betake you to some shade, and fit you to your manhood.-Ibid., iii.

4. Pray, sir, [let us go] to the army: I and my brother.-Ibid., iv. 4. Now let me turn] to my daughter's letter.Per., ii. 5. What, shall we (go) toward the Tower ?—R. III., iii. 2. Let us go] toward the king.–Macb., i. 3. But (be gone], up to the mountains !-Cym., iii. 3. Bid them all home; he's gone, and we 'll [go] no farther.Coriol., iv, 2. Now we'll [go) together; and the chance of goodness.—Macb., iv. 3. Sons, we'll [go] higher to the mountains.--Cym., iv. 4. Soft, soft! we'll [have] no defence.-Ibid., iii. 4. His lordship will [depart) next morning for France.-All's W., iv. 3. We will (go) ourself in person to this war.-R. II., i. 4. We will not (move) from the helm to sit and weep.—3 H. VI., v. 4. Why, then, will I (fight] no more.—Tr. & Cr., iv. 5. Where's Hector? I will [have, or fight with] none but Hector.-Ibid., v. 5. I will not (go) out of doors . . . I will not (go] over the threshold indeed, I will not (go) forth.-Coriol., i. 3.

Nay, your wit will not [issue) so soon out as another man's will—'tis strongly wedged up in a block-head. Ibid., ii. 3.

I will (go) to-morrow (and betimes I will [go]) to the. -Macb., iii. 4.
He calls to horse ; but will [go] I know not whither.-Lear, ii. 4.
I will [go] with you to the court.2 H. IV., iii. 2.
By the good gods, I'd [go) with thee every foot.---Coriol., iv. I.

I mean, Master Slender, what would you (have) with me ?_Truly, for mine own part, I would (have) little or nothing with you.--Merry W., iii. 4.

Now, say, Chatillon, what would France (have) with us ?--John, i. 1.
He is very sick, and would [go to bed.--H. V., ii. 1.
There's something more would [proceed] out of thee; what say'st ?-H. VIII., 1. 2.
Now say, what would Augustus Cæsar (have) with us ?-Cym., iii. 1.
Where's Troilus? -- What wouldst thou? [have with him).-Tr. & Cr., v. 6.

IMPERATIVE MOOD: SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD. Shakespeare occasionally uses both these moods very elliptically; allowing one or more words to be understood in the sentence thus constructed. Witness the following passages where he employs the imperative mood :

But, be it (so] ; let it live: it shall not neither.-W. T., ii. 3.
Love they to live [* let them love to live') that love and honour have.-R. II., ji. 1.
Hold out my horse [' let but my horse hold out'], and I will first be there.Ibid., ii. 1.
(May) thy ignominy sleep with thee in the grave,
But not [be] remember'd in thy epitaph !-· H. IV., v. 4.
Now bind my brows with iron; and (let) approach
The ragged'st hour that time and spite dare bring,
To frown upon th' enrag'd Northumberland.—2 H. IV., i. 1.
Yet (let] Heavens have glory for this victory !-1 H. VI., iii. 2.
Dismay not [' be not dismayed '], princes, at this accident.-Ibid., iii. 3.
Before young Talbot from old Talbot fly,
[Let] the coward horse that bears me fall and die !-Ibid., iv. 6.
[Let it] sort how it will, I shall have gold for all.--2 H. VI., i. 2.
Ask what thou wilt : (would) that I had said and done !—Ibid., i.
(May) such hope have all the line of John of Gaunt !-3 H. VI., i. 1.
This day, [let] no man think he has business at his house.-H. VIII., v. 4.

Know the whole world (be it known to the whole world'] he is as valiant.Tr. & Cr., vi. 3.

Appear it [' let it appear '] to your mind that.-Ibid., iii. 3.

(Let] what [ever] may be sworn by, both divine and human, seal what I end withal! Coriol., iii. 1.

Wash they [' let them wash '] his wounds with tears.-R. & Ful., iii. 2.
Henceforth [let there] be no feast, whereat a villain's not.— Timon, iii. 6.
[Would] that the whole life of Athens were in this !-Ibid., iv. 3.
[Let] those enemies of Timon's, and mine own,
Whom you yourselves shall set out for reproof,
Fall, and no more.-Ibid., v. 5.
If I know this, know [' be it known to '] all the world besides, that.-Jul. C., i. 3.
Now know you l' be it known to you ’], Casca, I have mov'd.-Ibid., i. 3.
[May) the gods to-day stand friendly, that we may,
Lovers in peace, lead on our days to age ! -Ibid., v. I.
Therefore our everlasting farewell [let us) take.Ibid., v. I.
And (may] the chance of goodness be like our warranted quarrel !—Macb., iv. 3.

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