Calhoun's Philosophy of Politics: A Study of A Disquisition on Government

Capa
Mercer University Press, 2000 - 435 páginas
John C. Calhoun's A Disquisition on Government has been hailed since its publication in 1851 as a classic in political science and has been called the greatest work of American political theory. Guy Story Brown's Calhoun's Philosophy of Politics is the first comprehensive explication de texte of Calhoun's great work on political theory. This traditional textual analysis places Calhoun's theory within the broader context of the political philosophy he himself studied, from Aristotle to Bacon and the moderns on up to Rousseau and the Federalists. It also pays close attention to Calhoun's literary models, such as Livy. The result is the definitive interpretation of Calhoun's political philosophy and theory. This book makes Calhoun's philosophy accessible to contemporary thinkers and shows what Calhoun thought about issues such as world government.

Topics discussed in Calhoun's Philosophy of Politics include nature and political science, empire and world government, political science and government, and political science and human progress.

 

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Calhouns Disquisition on Government
1
The Context of Calhouns Philosophy of Politics
4
The Philosophical Inquirer
26
The Text and Context of A Disquisition on Government
34
Nature and Political Science
51
Natural Science and the Science of Government
52
The Social Nature of Mankind
55
The Political Nature of Mankind
59
Important Common Errors on the Subject
188
Paragraphs 5398
197
Forms of Power
198
Power and Reason
199
Necessity and Power
202
The Principles of Constitutional Government and the Preservation of the Common Interest
207
The Constitutional Principle and the Perfection of the Moral Faculties
210
The Constitutional Principle and the Perfection of the Intellectual and Moral Faculties
215

Excursus on the Relation of Calhoun to Hegel and Marx or the German Philosophy of Freedom pp 6278
62
The Practical Necessity of Government Feelings
79
The Theoretical Necessity of Government Calhouns Relation to the British and French Philosophy of Nature
90
The Improbability of Constitutional Government
104
Examples of Partially Successful Constitutional Governments
113
Empire and World Government
121
Calhoun and the History of Political Philosophy
122
History and Natural Circumstances
138
The Republican Constitution of Rome
140
The Monarchic Constitution of Great Britain
154
Comparison of the Great Constitutional Governments
160
Political Science and Government
167
Paragraphs 1952
168
The Action of Government and the Common Interest
170
Justice and the Operation of Government
180
The Principle of Constitution and the Common Interest
182
Digression on the Hypothesis of the State of Nature
223
The Conclusion
234
The Principles of Constitution and the Promotion of Liberty
236
The Principles of Constitution and the Present Condition of the World
238
The Promotion of Liberty and Moral Power
244
Political Science and Progress
247
Common Objections as to Practicability
250
Plausible Objections
251
The Most Illustrative Examples of the Principles of Constitutional Government
264
The New Political Element and Progress
268
The Forms of Government and Constitution
272
Calhoun and the New Age
295
Foreword
313
Afterword
421
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Página 18 - If all mankind, minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
Página 29 - It is the power which raises man above the brute - which distinguishes his faculties from mere sagacity, which he holds in common with inferior animals. It is this power which has raised the astronomer from being a mere gazer at the stars to the high intellectual eminence of a Newton or a Laplace, and astronomy itself from a mere observation of isolated facts into that noble science which displays to our admiration the system of the universe.

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