Shakespeare's Theory of Drama

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Cambridge University Press, 23.07.1998 - 232 Seiten
Why did Shakespeare write drama? Did he have specific reasons for his choice of this art form? Did he have clearly defined aesthetic aims in what he wanted drama to do - and why? Pauline Kiernan opens up a new area of debate for Shakespearean criticism in showing that a radical, complex defence of drama which challenged the Renaissance orthodox view of poetry, history and art can be traced in Shakespeare's plays and poems. This study, first published in 1996, examines different stages in the canon to show that far from being restricted by the 'limitations' of drama, Shakespeare consciously exploits its capacity to accommodate temporality and change, and its reliance on the physical presence of the actor. This lively, readable book offers an original and scholarly insight into what Shakespeare wanted his drama to do and why.

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Inhalt

Introduction
1
Shakespeare and Sidney Two worlds the brazen and the golden
6
Shakespeare and Ovid What strained touches rhetoric can lend poetry metamorphosed in Venus and Adonis and the Sonnets
21
In scorn of nature art gave lifeless life exposing arts sterility The Rape of Lucrece The Winters Tale and The Tempest
59
Oerwrested seeming dramatic illusion and the repudiation of mimesis Loves Labours Lost A Midsummer Nights Dream and Hamlet
91
Thy registers and thee I both defy history challenged Richard III Henry VIII Henry V and Richard II
127
Antony and Cleopatra as A Defence of Drama
154
Notes
191
Bibliography
209
Index
216
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