The World We Want: Restoring Citizenship in a Fractured Age

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2001 - 252 páginas
What does it mean to be a citizen in a world of fractured identities and crumbling nationalism--when people are withdrawing into consumerism, cultural separatism, and self-regarding isolation? Citizenship meets one of our deepest needs, the need to belong; it also makes concrete the ethical commitments of care and respect. Political and cultural theorist Mark Kingwell traces the history of the idea of citizenship, and argues for a new model for the next century. In the style of Michael Ignatieff's The Needs of Strangers, he takes a long look at what citizenship has meant in the past and what it means today.

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The world we want: restoring citizenship in a fractured age

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In his sixth book, political-cultural theorist Kingwell (philosophy, Univ. of Toronto; Better Living: In Pursuit of Happiness from Plato to Prozac) poses the question of what citizenship means in an ... Ler resenha completa

Conteúdo

The World We Have
1
Rights and Duties
24
Virtues and Vices
75
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Sobre o autor (2001)

Mark Kingwell is professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto and an award winning political and cultural theorist. A prolific journalist, he writes regularly for such publications as Utne Reader, New York Times Magazine, and Harper's. Kingwell has published five books including Better Living: In Pursuit of Happiness from Plato to Prozac, Marginalia: A Cultural Reader, and the Canadian bestseller Canada: Our Century.

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