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his letter on Old Friendships. His fertility of logical invention is probably unrivalled.

Jan. 30. Read the Life of Sir William Jones. Burke mentions in a letter, that he had been long disused to Greek literature ; that the orators had fared worse from the translators than the poets ; that he could never bear to read a translation of Cicero; that Demosthenes suffers less, but that the English reader must still marvel whence he acquired his transcendant fame. Sir William Jones was a man who, without anything strikingly original or profound in his genius, appears to have possessed greater attainments, a more extensive and mixed erudition, and more personal accomplishments, than any man perhaps in the records of biography. His belief (not very deep rooted, perhaps) in Christianity, appears to have been founded on the prophecies in the Old Testament.

March 19. Read Twining's Preface to his Aristotle, and his first Dissertation. I am charined with his masculine sense and good taste, transferred in an original and nervous style, defective in nothing but facility. Of Aristotle, he observes in his preface, that, austere and cold as his philosophy appears, it has not encroached on his taste; that he has not indeed expressed that taste, but has discovered it in his principles, which are truly poetical, never losing sight of the end of poetry—“Pleasure”-and allowing every means for the attainment of that end. Good and original criticisin, he maintains, depends on a combination of taste and philosophy, strength of feeling, and strength of thought. In the Dissertation, he examines how far poetry is or is not an imitative art, as Aristotle considers it: a perplexing discussion, as the two terms seem neither co-extensive nor commensurable, but his treatment of it renders it agreeable. I have heard Kilburne speak with rapture of his (Twining's) thrilling expression on the violin-he exalts the expressive powers of Pergolesi, above those of Handel and Purcell.

March 24. Finished Lord Melcombe's Diary. He exhibits in his own person, a finished portrait of the thorough-paced, unprincipled, political courtier, to which nothing but his own representation of his overtures, soundings, professions, insinuations, smooth menaces, reflections, in his own ineffable language, can do justice. He carries the courtier with him to his closet, and even his very scoldings are in that character. What a despicable and detestable scene does he open, enough to sicken one of Courts and Kings for ever. The education of the Prince (George III.) appears to have been a wretched one. Shut up from all liberal acquaintance and liberal knowledge, his mother represents him as shy, backward, good-natured, cheerful, but with a serious cast of mind; not quick, but to those whom he knew, intelligent.

May 8. The Memoires de Bailly exhibit a most masterly view of the errors in the early part of the French Revolution. To be secure and respectable, the authority of a Representative Assembly (the Edinburgh Review of the book, p. 17, justly observes) should be made

up
of the

separate authority of the individuals who compose it, not artificially derived from delegation. The men should confer dignity and weight on the office, not the office on the men. They should not operate as on a foreign substance, but be consubstantiated with the people for whom they legislate. Is not this article by Mackintosh, aided by Burke's conversation ?

May 8. Walked with Mr. Prentice round the Park. Had much interesting conversation with him on religious subjects. Opened his mind very freely, and a little surprised me by some of his statements. Said Gent. Mag. Vol. I.

30

that, though impressed with a deep and firm conviction of the truth of revelation, he was sometimes staggered by the nature of the dispensation itself, He was much impressed with the failures of the promises of Christ in his own person ; he could say, he never had a prayer answered: and ulten was in a state of alienation from religion. He heard with much temper my free declaration. The description of his feelings on the repeated rejection of his prayers, reminded ine of the conduct of the people who tog their idols when disappointed of their petitions to them.

June 25. Dined at Ellis's. Tooke said, that Erskine affirmed to him, that the man whom for his abilities he least liked to have opposed to him, was late,

June 26. After dinner, went with Ellis to tea at Shee's. Opie called in the possesses, I think, but a very ordinary mind. Had much political discussion. It is remarkable that all artists and literati have a tendency, more or less, to revolutionary principles. Talleyrand few into a passion when asked by an Englishman whether he might remain in safety after the dation of our ambassador. Prenez-vous nous pour des barbares ?” he Friend:.- the day but one aiter they were all seized.

Juiyul tead Marmontels romantie account of his life. The French apporter to have a wonderful deal of feeling in the domestic relations,* to which were utter strangers in this country. He says that he soon found that the study of languages is also that of distinguishing the shades of ideas, of decomposing and seiring with precision their characteristic relaDious į that it forun iu truth a rich sense of elementary philosophy. There

tratta and depth in this remark. He atfirms that the practice of monthly comtension that modest, chaste, and humble avowal of our most **kt Rules, perhaps prevented a greater number of them than all the moat holy motive put together: I can readily believe him. He described

u precisely in Burko has done, as actuated by consuming vanity, Hvadiosing all the better parts of his character, and inflaming his mind to un tilspicious and distrust of all around him-loving mankind at a Mistance, but hating all who approached him. How accurate all Burke's intimatiou appears to have been! He neatly observes, that Voltaire had attica imacets to brush, then serpents to strangle.

duy, 13. Read Mome's Essary on Miracles. The longer I live, and the

* i Bed and Atleet, the higher l estimate Hume's merits. I never hehet foute wit the principle he assumes in this essay : that we beHow it featinomy wolely because we observe the connection that exists

****** and truth. There can be no doubt, I think, that we I do to believe in testimony, antecedently to the observation of ut such connection. ile admits that we are naturally inclined to speak

Why should he not have admitted that we are naturally inclined to believe what is asserted? And it appears to me that he might have ac

* A true, though to us * most melancholy remark, which Mr. Green might have piende heyond France. There is no Christian country which I ever visited, or wille whiteli i am acquainted, where the domestic charities are so cold, and the ties of Mindre so weak, as in the most moral country of the world ; they are more alive and Mon painly to be seen. I think, in the higher and the lower classes of the communi. ties, which will lead perhaps to the cause why they are so weakened and impaired in the intermediate stations of society, and will suggest some salutary reflections. The Apostle tells us that “ the love of money is the root of all evil!” Would it be very difficult then, when we know that the “root is evil,” to agree also with the deduction of the Gospel, “ that a corrupt tree bringeth not forth good fruit,” and that the posBCNsions of men are indeed snares to them.--Evit.

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that, though impressed with a deep and firm conviction of the truth of revelation, he was sometimes staggered by the nature of the dispensation itself. He was much impressed with the failures of the promises of Christ in his own person ; he could say, he never had a prayer answered: and often was in a state of alienation from religion. He heard with much temper my free declaration. The description of his feelings on the repeated rejection of his prayers, reminded me of the conduct of the people who flog their idols when disappointed of their petitions to them.

June 25. Dined at Ellis's. Tooke said, that Erskine affirmed to him, that the man whom for his abilities he least liked to have opposed to him, was Law.

June 26. After dinner, went with Ellis to tea at Shee's. Opie called in. He possesses, I think, but a very ordinary mind. Had much political discussion. It is remarkable that all artists and literati have a tendency, more or less, to revolutionary principles. Talleyrand flew into a passion when asked by an Englishman whether he might remain in safety after the desertion of our ambassador. Prenez-vous nous pour des barbares ?” he cried :—the day but one after they were all seized.

July 21. Read Marmontels romantic account of his life. The French appear to have a wonderful deal of feeling in the domestic relations,* to which we are utter strangers in this country. He says that he soon found that the study of languages is also that of distinguishing the shades of ideas, of decomposing and seizing with precision their characteristic rela

that it forms in truth a rich sense of elementary philosophy. There is truth and depth in this remark. He affirms that the practice of monthly confession—that modest, chaste, and humble avowal of our most secret faults, perhaps prevented a greater number of them than all the most holy motives put together : I can readily believe him. He described Rousseau precisely as Burke has done, as actuated by consuming vanity, destroying all the better parts of his character, and inflaming his mind to insane suspicions and distrust of all around hiin-loving mankind at a distance, but hating all who approached him. How accurate all Burke's information appears to have been! He neatly observes, that Voltaire had rather insects to brush, than serpents to strangle.

Aug. 13. Read Hume's Essay on Miracles. The longer I live, and the more I read and reflect, the higher I estimate Hume's merits. I never however could admit the principle he assumes in this essay : that we believe in testimony solely because we observe the connection that exists between testimony and truth. There can be no doubt, I think, that we are disposed to believe in testimony, antecedently to the observation of any such connection. He admits that we are naturally inclined to speak truth. Why should he not have admitted that we are naturally inclined to believe what is asserted ? And it appears to me that he might have ac

tions ;

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A true, though to us a most melancholy remark, which Mr. Green might have extended beyond France. There is no Christian country which I ever visited, or with which I am acquainted, where the domestic charities are so cold, and the ties of kindred so weak, as in the most moral country of the world; they are more alive and more plainly to be seen, I think, in the higher and the lower classes of the communi. ties, which will lead perhaps to the cause why they are so weakened and impaired in the intermediate stations of society, and will suggest some salutary reflections. The Apostle tells us that “ the love of money is the root of all evil!” Would it be very difficult then, when we know that the “root is evil,” to agree also with the deduction of the Gospel, “ that a corrupt tree bringeth not forth good fruit," and that the possessions of men are indeed snares to them. Edit.

connted for this inclination on his own principles of belief, from the vivid exhibition of ideas to the mind. Nor can I see or allow the application of what he has said on miracles to prophecies. There appears a falling in Hume's argument, for are we not all, with respect to asserted Miracles, in the same situation that he states the Indian King was in respecting the asserted existence of Eve? They are facts not contrary to our experience, but not conformable to it. There is no opposite proof, but merely presumption, which adequate proof may countervail. His incidental arguments are stronger than his main.

Aug. 1. Read the Connoisseur. It displays no great vigour of thought, or depth of judgment, or acuteness of discrimination, but there are frequently amusing corruscations of playful wit. It is happily observed in the 125th Number, that the Poets of the former age thought poetically, while those of the present only express themselves so.

Aug. 3. Walked with Fisin round the gaol. The gallows erecting for the execution, F. mentioned that a friend of his had often inquired of a person who had been turned off, and cut down on a reprieve, what were his sensations? He said the preparations were dreadful beyond all expression. On being dropped, found himself midst fields and rivers of blood,-gradually acquired a greenish tinge-imagined if he could reach a certain spot in the same, he should be easy-struggled forcibly to attainand felt no more !!

Aug. 27. Read the third volume of the Adventurer. It may be observed, that there is no instance of a frantic benevolence, forming its purpose on false principles, and pursuing it by ridiculous means; or of an extravagant cheerfulness, founded on the fancied felicity of others. If the lunatic is merry, he is never kind; bis sport is always mischief, and his malevolence is in proportion to his derangement.

Sept. 6. Read with great disgust Otway's Orphan. Its merit is the forcible, vivid, and impassioned description in particular passages ; for the fable itself is inartificially unfolded, unnaturally conducted, and revoltingly concluded. The characters themselves have little interest; and the moral sentiments are of the most profligate and abandoned cast. How would Acasto like to have his supposed dying precepts to his son-a forced supposition, merely to give them weight-tried against his daughters? There is to me a something in Otway, a shocking mixture of profligate voluptuousness and savage ferocity, most abhorrent to my feelings, and which converts my delight at his excellencies, into a sensation of vicious enjoyment.

Sept. 12. Sat for my likeness to Bennett, while engaged in a very pleasant conversation with Mr. Bradstreet. Mentioned a capital pun of Tom Warton's. The ladies at Oxford were giggling while Signor Tenducci was singing. Somebody observed that it was extremely ill-bred. “Oh !" said Warton, “ ladies have no idea of breeding in company

with Signor Tenducci.” Lee mentioned that he was chatting with Tom Warton on a plan then in agitation, of executing criminals in a sort of gown, to add to the solemnity, to which, it was said, there was an objection from gentlemen of the long robe. Lee proposed a watchman's great coat. “ Yes," said T. Warton, “but it must have hanging sleeves."

Dec. 21. Began the Walpoliana, interlarded with Lord Chedworth's notes. His Lordship states,

" that he had heard it conjectured by a person of great literary fame, wlo seemed satisfied of the truth of his conjec

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