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pure religious literature. Let the Presbyterian Church be aroused to make her Board of Publication a fountain which shall do much to swell this new stream of life-giving influences. All that is necessary is to get the church to seo the need as we see it. I am faithfully yours,

John M. KYLE.

but appeals come to us from all portions of our foreign missionary field. With us, as with the Foreign Board, the field is the world.

The following letters, received from all portions of the world, will serve to indicate the extent and importance of our work:

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL, April 13, 1887. DR. J. W. DULLES.

DEAR BROTHER:—The box containing the five thousand copies of the tract “Evangelical Religion ” has arrived in good order. I thank you in the name of the Brazil mission for the Board's liberal grant. Scarcely another tract has been so useful to the Protestant cause as this one, and we cannot be too grateful to the Board for publishing it in such an attractive style. The author told me that he had not been able to discover a single typographical error, a compliment you cannot fully appreciate until you examine some of the books and papers published in Brazil. The tract, containing as it does a manly exposition of Protestant doctrines in clear and concise language, should be scattered broadcast through this

d. Would that we had a half a million copies for gratuitous distribution !

I hope that our Presbyterian Church may soon come to understand that her Board of Publication is a foreign as well as a home missionary agency, and furnish you abundant means with which to publish and scatter Portuguese and Spanish books and tracts in large quantities. No other church is doing so much for the evangelization of Mexico and South America as our own. The work of the Foreign Board needs the help of the Board of Publication. It would be an incalculable advantage to this large and growing work to have an increased supply of such tracts as “Evangelical Religion” to aid in strictly evangelistic work; and we have reached a stage when our churchmembership in these countries need a larger number of sound and instructive religious books if they are to grow in intelligence and influence. The American and Religious Tract Societies are doing all they can in this direction, but there are many important books which these societies for various reasons cannot publish. The books which come to South America in largest numbers are French romances and infidel publications. If Protestantism is to gain and maintain a permanent footing in these South American states, she must counteract the influence of this poisonous stream by starting a counter-current of

LAHORE, NORTH INDIA, June 4, 1887. TO THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY, PRES

BYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION. DEAR BROTHER:-About a year ago I wrote a letter to Dr. Dulles, then secretary of the Board, on the subject of our English work among Europeans and Eurasians in Lahore. I spoke of our Sunday-school, and expressed a wish to introduce some of the periodical publications of the Board, if I could get them at cheaper than the usual rates. Dr. Dulles, in reply, sent me a very kind and encouraging letter, expressing his deep sympathy with our English work. He had been in India, and knew something of the destitute condition of the lower classes of Europeans and Eurasians. He therefore offered to supply us with lesson leaves and Sunday-school papers at half price. I hope that this arrangement will be continued.

You know, perhaps, that a Christian college has been established at Lahore in connection with our Lodiana mission. It is the only Christian college our church has in India. We are very much in need of a good library. There are several libraries in Lahore, and they are full of infidel and skeptical books, such as J. S. Mill's writings, Draper's, Huxley's, Spencer's works. In order to counteract the bad influence such books must exert over the minds of native students, we should have our college library well supplied with good, readable, standard Christian books. I should feel greatly obliged if you could make us a grant of suitable books from among the publications of the Board. Of course you know what books would be suitable. Our students, for whom the library is chiefly intended, are not bogs, but young men, studying for the F.A. and B.A. degrees. They are about as far advanced as boys in our academies at home. I hope both these requests may receive a favorable

answer.

Believe me yours sincerely,

H. C. VELTE, Mission College, Lahore, North India, The grant asked for in the first part of this letter has been made. The condition of our funds, however, will hardly justify

self at once,

the bestowment of such a library as is The same committee was requested to correneeded by the college. Will not some large- spond with the Board in reference to the rehearted Christian brother extend a helping printing of our Form of Government and hand ?

Confession of Faith in Spanish. The old

edition, printed under the care of Rev. H. C. MEXICO, March 22, 1887.

Thomson, will soon be exhausted, and now Rev. JOHN W. DULLES, D.D.

seems the time to thoroughly revise its translaDEAR SIR:- More than a year ago, at the tion and incorporate the new book of discirequest of the Presbytery of the City of Mex- pline. We all hold ourselves in readiness to ico, I commenced, and subsequently finished, a do this work if the Board so direct, and wish Spanish translation of the Rev. Samuel J. in this way to bring the question before you Baird's manual or catechism of church gov- for thoughtful consideration. ernment, called “The Church of Christ, its Assured that you will appreciate the motives Constitution and Order.” It is a work which that prompt this letter, and that, as far as all our missionaries and native preachers feel within your power, our application will be the need of in the homes and especially in the promptly and favorably dealt with, I shall not Sabbath-schools and churches under our care, take more of your valuable time, but sign myin order to teach our people by simple question and answer what our communion is, its

Yours most sincerely, principles and methods.

HUBERT W. BROWN. The annual conference, composed of all our

In a subsequent letter Mr. Brown writes : missionaries, in its last reunion, held at Sal

I have talked the matter over with Dr. tillo the past February, knowing what had been done, without solicitation on my part

Greene, and he thinks we could promise to took the following action:

take five hundred copies of each of the works “That Messrs. Brown and Haymaker be ap

mentioned. Beyond this we are not in a conpointed a committee to correspond with the

dition to help. But could not both be used in Presbyterian Board of Publication with refer

other Spanish countries where Protestant misence to the publication of Mr. Brown's trans

sions are established ? lation of 'Baird's Catechism of Church Gov

I sincerely hope the Board may be able to ernment,' and, in case the Board agree to

accede to the joint request of our Missionary publish it, to present it in good form for the

Conference and Presbytery. I know that you

will if at all possible. At Mr. Haymaker's written request I have The publication of these works is of great written this letter in the name of us both. I

importance, and properly belongs to the bewish only to add that the translation has re

nevolent work of the Board.

To some it ceived one revision from Prof. Aguirre, Spanish editor of El Faro, some of whose transla

may seem that it belongs to the Business tions have been already published. If the

Department, and so in a sense it does. It Board receive this application favorably, he

would involve, however, so large an exwill make another and searching correction,

pense for which no remuneration could be after which the whole will be copied off in its received, that as a business operation it could corrected form.

hardly be undertaken. Money contributed It is utterly impossible to print the book on for publication would be well invested. the mission press, for two reasons—the amount of work on hand already and the imperative necessity of keeping within our appropriations

WHAT OUGHT TO BE DONE received for the press. And is it asking too TO BRING INTO SABBATH-SCHOOLS THE MILmuch that our Board should help in this, since the book can doubtless be of service in all YOUTH? Spanish countries now open to our church? I

Idle Christians ought to be aroused. We ask in the name of all our missionaries, as well as in response to the appeal of our native

may as well say it first as last, for we shall brethren, that the Board give this request,

be forced to its utterance. There is no anwhich we most respectfully make, a careful and

swer to be found to the question asked above, thoughtful and, if possible, a favorable consid- except before the heart and conscience of the eration.

individual Christian.

press."

LIONS OF NEGLECTED AND PERISHING HERE.

There are 700,000 members of the Presby

THE CRITICAL HOUR. terian Church. Not one-third of these are In addition to the needs for this work set engaged in Sabbath-school work in any form. forth in the August number, there is another A large portion of these, not now enlisted, startling fact to be noted. It is that the are by knowledge and experience, in a meas- battle of the ages comes to a crisis in this ure, fitted to become workers. Amos

latter part of the nineteenth century and to them, “ Woe to them that are at ease in

in this country.

The word is now and Zion. . . . Ye that put far away the evil

The issue is, Who shall have the day, and cause the seat of violence to come children of America ? The world or Christ? near ; that lie upon beds of ivory, and stretch Materialism or Christ? Infidelity or Christ? themselves upon their couches, and eat the The very activity of our enemy is a stimlambs out of the flock, and the calves out ulus. It must be confessed that our foes are of the midst of the stall; that sing idle songs making a persistent fight. They are surto the sound of the viol; that devise for rounding our children with all the enticethemselves instruments of music, like David; ments of evil. Never in the history of manthat drink wine in bowls, and anoint them- kind were boys and girls encompassed with selves with the chief ointments; but they such snares and pitfalls as to-day. Temptaare not grieved for the affliction of Joseph.” tions assail them which we, in youth, never (Amos 6:1, 3-6, Rev. Ver.)

knew. The beer-garden and the gilded

saloon allure their senses. Flaunting adHOW CAN THIS BE DONE?

vertisements of hurtful indulgences stare at

them daily. Nightly theatres arouse and There are, assuredly, means at the com- stimulate their lower passions. Every year mand of the pastor, the Sunday-school the holy guards of the Sabbath day are being superintendent, the session and other

weakened. Society has manners and habits workers, to gradually awaken the latent which undermine manly and womanly virChristian enthusiasm of these idlers in the tue. It is, alas! true that even in so-called church. These means include prayer; scrip- Christian homes, youth are tempted by the tural instruction as to the privilege and duty dance, the wine-glass and the card-table. of every believer to be a co-worker with There are two sources of evil which demand God, and as to the need for Sabbath-school particular mention: one is the night mismission work everywhere in this land; the education of the streets; the other is bad sympathizing interpretation of the cry of the reading. An abominable literature is deignorant, the outcast, the perishing children filing the land, like the Egyptian plague and youth; reports of work done by other of frogs. Everywhere, on the street and in churches and missions. Can men call

the house, are papers and books covertly or themselves Christians and have none of openly glorifying vice, and making heroes of the mind of Christ, “who went about boy criminals, boy pickpockets, boy burglars, doing good”? call themselves Christians boy murderers, boy incendiaries. These and and yet live on unmoved by the need of the other perils are besetting our children. perishing millions of this land, the least of

There is not a truly Christian parent who whom Christ calls his brethren? Can Chris- does not dread the dangers around his tians dream on of heaven, and no cry of lost beloved. What then must be the power

of souls disturb their selfish, guilty sleep? these temptations over the ten millions of “To him that knoweth to do good and doeth boys and girls who have no Christian home it not, to him it is sin."

nor church nor Sabbath-school?

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A MISAPPREHENSIGN.

ing, and surely this church is feeble in comThe great majority of the applications to parison with one able to pay $100,000 for this Board for aid in building are in be- an edifice. Thus it comes to pass

that

every half of small churches whose present needs now and then an application reaches us from and desires are satisfied with small, inexpen- a church that is building at an expense of sive edifices, costing from one thousand to $8000 or $9000, and which has expended three thousand dollars. This is in accord- more than $1000 in heavy hard-wood pews, ance with the original intention of the Gen- soft cushions, handsome carpets, marbleeral Assembly, which in the plan adopted, topped tables and elaborate stained-glass under which the Board works, stated em- windows. These things are in themselves phatically, “This fund having been com- excellent; but after all it must be admitted mitted to the General Assembly as a special that they are luxuries, and for them the trust, no part of it as now established, nor church could afford to wait rather than apany additions which may hereafter be made ply for a contribution from a fund intended to it, shall ever be used for

any
other

purpose for such churches as that described in one than that of aiding feeble congregations," etc. of this month's letters by the Rev. M. El

More than one Assembly has called at- lis, of Grantsdale, Montana, or another in tention to this, the obvious and proper sphere Nebraska of which the missionary says, “Our of the Board, and at different times distinct people feel that they would like a church of instruction has been given fixing "the max

their own.

I have rather dissuaded them imum of any grant to any church at $1000, from it for the present, but our ladies there and directing the Board in making grants feel that they could do more good if they to give special consideration and preference had a church of their own. They request to the weaker churches and less costly build- me to ask you if they should raise $500 on ings, when other things are equal."

the ground, how much you would give This is as it should be, and, as we have them." already said, is generally understood. But The other misapprehension is that the there two misapprehensions which Assembly's rule in regard to aid to the exnot infrequently cause perplexity to the tent of one-third of the cost means that that Board, and doubtless disappointment to the proportion will always be given. The exchurches concerned. One of these is that pression is sometimes used, “This is less the Board should extend aid to all churches than we are entitled to under your rules.” that feel that it is difficult to pay for a church It is obvious that no thoughtful considerthat meets their full expectations. For ex- ation of the object of the Board would sugample, a church having a membership per- gest that aid is to be given in any case behaps of from sixty to eighty, and a congre- yond the actual need. The rule is, “The gation of forty or fifty families, are able to sum appropriated to any congregation shall raise four or five thousand dollars in addi- never be more than one-third of the amount tion to their lot. The sum thus secured contributed and secured by them for the will complete a building abundantly large house and lot.” The question should not and quite adequate to all their needs, but a come first, “How much will the Board thousand dollars more will of course add to give?" as preparatory to a calculation how the beauty of the edifice, and the question little the church will have to raise; but first, arises, Why should they not receive it from “How much can we raise upon

the ground, the Board ? They reason, the Board was and how little need we apply for to the Biablished to aid feeble churches in build- Board ?"

are

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