Independence Day: Its Celebration, Spirit and Significance as Related in Prose and Verse

Capa
Robert Haven Schauffler
Moffat, Yard, 1912 - 318 páginas
 

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Página 73 - Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us: they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging.
Página 239 - Liberty first and Union afterwards ; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart, Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable.
Página 204 - My native country, thee — Land of the noble free — Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills; My heart with rapture thrills Like that above.
Página 107 - We have but to reach forth to it, and it is ours. Why, then, should we defer the Declaration? Is any man so weak as now to hope for a reconciliation with England, which shall leave either safety to the country and its liberties, or safety to his own life and his own honor?
Página 61 - Every man of an immense crowded audience appeared to me to go away as I did, ready to take arms against writs of assistance. Then and there was the first scene of the first act of opposition to the arbitrary claims of Great Britain. Then and there the child Independence was born. In fifteen years, ie in 1776, he grew up to manhood and declared himself free.
Página 238 - I profess, sir, in my career, hitherto, to have kept steadily in view the prosperity and honor of the whole country, and the preservation of our Federal Union. It is to that Union we owe our safety at home and our consideration and dignity abroad. It is to that Union that we are chiefly indebted for whatever makes us most proud of our country.
Página 211 - United States ! the ages plead, — Present and Past in under-song, — • Go put your creed into your deed, Nor speak with double tongue. For sea and land don't understand, Nor skies without a frown See rights for which the one hand fights By the other cloven down.
Página 147 - Their love of liberty, as with you, fixed and attached on this specific point of taxing. Liberty might be safe, or might be endangered, in twenty other particulars, without their being much pleased or alarmed. Here they felt its pulse; and as they found that beat, they thought themselves sick or sound. I do not say whether they were right or wrong in applying your general arguments to their own case. It is not easy, indeed, to make a monopoly of theorems and corollaries. The fact is, that they did...
Página 71 - English communion that gives all their life and efficacy to them. It is the spirit of the English constitution which, infused through the mighty mass, pervades, feeds, unites, invigorates, vivifies, every part of the empire, even down to the minutest member.
Página 120 - DELAWARE Caesar Rodney Geo Read Tho M'Kean MARYLAND Samuel Chase Wm. Paca Thos. Stone Charles Carroll of Carrollton VIRGINIA George Wythe Richard Henry Lee Th Jefferson Benja Harrison Thos. Nelson Jr. Francis Lightfoot Lee Carter Braxton NORTH CAROLINA Wm. Hooper Joseph Hewes, John Penn SOUTH CAROLINA Edward Rutledge Thos Heyward Junr. Thomas Lynch Junr. Arthur Middleton GEORGIA Button Gwinnett Lyman Hall Geo Walton CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES...

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