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tempts the fishes, and makes them take it the more eager. The size of the hook, No. 6.

The Blue Dun Fly. Comes on the beginning of March, and continues till the middle of April; its wings are made of a feather out of the starling's wing, or the blue feathers that grow under the wing of a duck widgeon ; the body is made of the blue fur off a fox, or the blue part of a squirrel's fur, mixed with a little yellow mohair, and a fine blue cock's hackle wrapped over the body, in imitation of the legs : as it swims down the water, its wings stand upright on its back ; its tail-forked, and of the same color of its wings. It appears on the water about ten o'clock in the forenoon, and continues till about three in the afternoon; but the principal time of the day is from twelve till two, the fies then come down in great quantities, and are always more plentiful in dark, cold, gloomy days, than in bright sun shiny weather. Your morning's fishing, till the flies come on, should be with the worm or minnow; the size of the hook this fly is made on, is No.7; but if the water is very low and fine, No. s.

The Brown Fly, or Dun Drake. Comes on about the middle of March, and continues till the latter end of April ; its wings are made off the feather of a pheasant's wing, which is full of fine shade, and exactly resembles the wing of the fly; the body is made of the bright part of hare's fur, mixed with a little of the red

part

of squirrel's fur, ribbed with yellow silk, and a partridge's hackle wrapt over twice or thrice under

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the but of the wing: as it swims down the'water, its wings stand upright upon its back, its tail is forked, and the color of its wings: it comes upon the water about eleven o'clock, and continues on till two, appearing on the water in shoals, or great quantities; in dark gloomy days, at the approach of the least gleam of sun, it is amazing to see, in a moment's time, the surface of the water almost covered with ten thousands of these pretty little flying insects, and the fishes rising and sporting at them, insomuch that you would think the whole river was alive; it is a pleasing siglit to the angler, and affords him great diversion ; in this manner they appear on the water every succesive day, till the end of their duration. The blue dun, and the brown, are both on at the same time, the blues are most plentiful in cold and dark days, and the browns in warm and gloomy days; though I have often seen blues, browns, and granams, on at the same time, when they have refused the other two sorts, and have taken the browns only: there cannot be too much said in cominendation of this fly, both for its duration, and the sport it affords the angler: The size of the hook it is made on, is No. 6.

The Granam-fly, or Green-tail. Comes on about the beginning of April, if the weather is warm, being a very tender fly, and cannot endure the cold. When they first appear on the water, they do so in great quantities, in bright mornings, you may begin to fish with them from six o'clock in the morning till eleven ; then you will find the browns come on, which you, must use, as the fish will not touch the granams as long

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as the browns continue ; about five o'clock in the evening you may use the granams again with success, the browns having then totally disappeared for that day. The granam-fly is a four-winged fly: as it swims down the water its wings lie flat on its back, it has a small bunch of eggs, of a green color, which gives it the name of the Greentail-fly; as soon as it lights on the water, it drops its eggs; it is of short duration, not lasting above a week, and then totally disappears for that year. The wings are made from a feather out of the wing of a partridge or pheasant, which is shaded like the wing of the fly; the body is made of the fur from a hare's face, or ear, and a grizzled hackle of a cock wrapt under the but of the wings. The hook, No. 8.

The Spider Fly. Comes on about the twentieth of April, if the weather is warm, and continues on about a fortnight : they are bred in beds of gravel.by the water-side, where you may find them in bunches engendering, to prepare for their production the next year : in cold and stormy days they hide themselves in the gravel, not being able to endure cold. You may fish with it from sun-rise till sun-set; being a very killing fiy, too much cannot be faid in its praise. The wings are made from a woodcock's feather, out of the but of the wing; the body of lead-coloured silk, with a black cock's hackle wrapt twice or thrice under the wings. This fly cannot be made too fine. The hook, No. 8, or 9.

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The Black Caterpillar. Comes on about the beginning of May, and continues on about a fortnight, and is to be fished with after hot sun-shiny mornings; if winds and clouds appear, they then grow weak for want of the sun, and fall upon the waters in great quantities. The wings are made froin a feather out of a jay's wing, the body of an ostrich's feather, which is preferable to the plover's, and fine black cock's hackle wrapt over the body. It is a very killing fly in small brooks. The hook, No. ".

The Little Iron-blue-fly. Comes on about the seventh of May, and continues on till the middle of June. In cold stormy days they come down the waters in great quantities, but in warın days there are but few to be seen. As it swims down the water, its wings stand upright on its back ; its tail is forked, and the color of its wings : it is a neat curious fly, and cannot be made too fine, it is to be fished with from about eleven o'clock in the forenoon till three in the afternoon. When these flies are on, the fishes refuse every other sort, and take these only, every sort of fish being fond of them. The wings are made from a cormorant's feather that grows under the wing, or off the feather of a dark blue-hen, that grows on the body, under the wings; the body is made of water-rats fur, ribbed with yellow silk, and a sooty blue hackle of a cock, wrapt over the body. The hook, No. 8 or 9.

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The Yellow Sally Fly. Comes on about the twentieth of May, and continues on' till about the tenth or twelfth of June. It is a four-winged fly; as it swims down the water its wings lie flat on its back. The wings are made with a yellow cock's hackle, and the body of marten's fur, taken from the spots under the jaws, which is a fine yellow. It is one of those fiies that prepare the fish to look for the May-fly, er Green-drake. The hock, No.7.

The Oak, Ash, Woodcock, Cannon, or Down

hill-Fly. Comes on about the sixteenth of May, and continues on till about a week in June; it is to be found on the buis of trees, with its head always downwards, which gives it the name of the Downhill-fly. It is bred in oak-apples, and is the best of all flies for bobbing at the bush in the natural way, and a good fly for the dab-line, when made artificially. The wings are made from a feather out of the wing of a partridge or woodcock, the body with a bittern's feather, and the head with a little of the brown part of hare's fur. The hook,

No. 7.

N. B. Some dub it with black wool and I sabella-coloured mohair, and bright brownish bear's hair, warped on with yellow silk, but the head of an ash colour; others dub it with an orange tawney and black ground; and others with blackish wool and gold twist ; the wings off the brown part of a mallard's feather.

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