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Fool, dust thou think he'd revel on the store,
Absolve the care of Heav'n, nor ask for more?
Though waters flow'd, flow'rs bloom'd, and Phcebug shone.
He'd sigh, he'd murmur, thathe was alone.
For know, the Maker on the human breast,
A sense of kindred, country, man, impress'd.
11 Though nature's works the ruling mind declare,

And well deserve inquiry's serious care,
, The God,(whate'er misanthropy may say.)
Shines, beams in man with most unclouded ray.
What boots it thee to fly from pole to pole?
Hang o'er the sun, and with the planets roll?
What boots through space's furthest bourns to roam?
If thou, O man, a stranger art at home.
Then know thyself, the human mind survey;
The use, the pleasure, will the toil repay.
11 Nor study only, practice what you know;
Your life, your knowledge, to mankind you owe.
With Plato's olive wreath the bays entwine;
Those who in study, should in practice shine.
Say, does the learned lord of Haeley's shade,

Charm man so much by mossy fountains laid,
As when arous'd, he stems corruption's course,
And shakes the senate with a Tullv's force?
When freedom jrasp'd beneath a Cesar's feet.
Then public virtue might to shades retreat:
But where she breathes, the least may U3cfu! be,

And freedom, Britain, still belongs to thee.
13 Though man's .ungrateful, or though fortune frown;

Is the reward of worth asong, or crown?

Nor yet unrecompens'd are virtue's pair.?;

Good Allen lives, and bounteous Brunswick reigns.

On each condition disappointments wait,

Enter the hut, and force the guarded gate.

Nor dare repine, though'oarly friendship-bleed,

From love, the world, and all its cares, he's freed.

But know, adversity's the child of God:

Whom Heaven approves of most, must feel her rod.

When smooth old Ocean, and each storm's asleep,

Then ignorance may plough the watery deep;

But when the demons of the tempest rave,

Skill must conduct the vessel through the wave. 14 Sidney, what good man envies not thy blow?

Who would not wish Anytus*—for a foe?

Intrepid vtrtue triumphs over fate;

* One of the accusers of Socrates. l . rr";.

.. . («?:>

The good can never be unfortunate. "•: £

And be thte maxim graven in thy mind;
The height of virtue is, to serve mankind.
But when old age has silver'd o'er thy head,;

When memory fails, and all thy vigour's fled,
Then mayst thou seek the stillness of retreat,
Then hear aloof the human tempest beat;
Then will I greet thee to my woodland cave,
Allay the pangs of age, and smooth thy grave.

GRAINGBS.

CONTENTS.

PART I.

PIECES IN PROSE.

""7 *"» CHAPTER I. Fag*

Select Sentences and Paragraphs, ....... It

CHAPTER II.

Harrative Piece*.

f*ot 1. No rank or possessions can make the guilty mind happy . Ss

2. Change of external condition often adverse to virtue M

8. Ha man; or the misery of pride .84

4. Lady Jane Grey i . . • 33

5. OrcogruU or the vanity of riches . . . M

6. The bill of science 40

'" 7. The journey of a day; a picture of human lif» 48

CHAPTER III. v

Didactic Pieces.

Beet. 1. The importance of a good education , , 49

2. On gratitude • 43

3. On forgiveness .... 48

4. Motives to the practice of gentleness . , . , 40

5. A suspicious temper the source of misery to it* possessor . . 50

fi. Comforts of religion 51

7. Diffidence of our abilities a mark of wisdom 52

8. On the importance of order in the distribution of eur time ... £3

9. The dignity of virtue amidst corrupt examples 55

10. The mortifications of vice greater than those of virtue .... 56

11. On contentment 57

12. Rank and riches afford no ground for envy 60

13. Patience under provocations our interest as well as duty . . . 61

14. Moderation in our wishes recommended . . 68

15. Omniscience and omnipresence of the Deity, the source of

consolation to good men .64

CHAPTER IV.

Argumentative Pieces.

Sect 1. Happiness is founded in rectitude of conduct ........ 6V

2. Virtue and piety man's highest interest • . •*

3. The iiyustic* of an uncharitable spirit 60

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4. The misfortunes of men mostly chargeable on themselves . . . TO

■>- On disinterested friendship 73

fi. On the immortality of the soul 75

CHAPTER V.

Descriptive Piece*.

***t . 1. The seasons 78

2. The cataract of Niagara, in Canada, North America 79

3. The grotto of Antiparos 80 .• i

4. The grottoof Antiparos continued 81 . /

5. Earthquake at Catanea 82'

6- Creation Kl

7. Charity 83

8. Prosperity is redoubled to a good man , . 84

9. On the beauties of the Psalms 85

10. Character of Alfred, king of England 86

It. Character of Queen Elizabeth * 87

12. The slavery of vice . . ■ -. . 83

13. The m*an of integrity * , • 90

14. Gentleness . 91

CHAPTER VI.

Pathetic Pieces.

Sect. 1. Trial and execution of the Earl of Strafford f. \ . 93

2. An eminent instance of true fortitude of mind ....... 94

3. The good man's comfort in affliction 85

4. The close of life Stf

5. Exalted society, and the renewal of virtuous connexions,

two sources of future felicity . . 88

6. The clemency and amiable character of the patriarch Joseph . 98

7. Altamont * . , . 101

CHAPTER VU.
Dialogues,

Sect. 1. Democritus and Heraclitus , , . . 108

% Dionysius, Pythias, and Damon 103

8. Locke and Bayle 1CTT

CHAPTER VIII. *

Public Speeches, 1

Sect . 1. Cicero against Verres . . . .* ... Ill

2. Speech of Adherbal to the Roman Senate, imploring

their protection against Jugurtha • US

5. The Apostle Paul's noble defence before Festus and Agrippa . 118
4. Lord Mansfield's speech in the House of Lordjjj l*T70,on the bill *

for preventing the delays of justice, by claiming the privi-
lege of parliament 120

6. An address to young persons 124

CHAPTER IX.
Promiscuous Pieces,

Beet. 1. Earthquake at Calabria; in the year 1638 127

2. Letter from Pliny to Germinius .180

- 3. Letter from Pliny to Marcellinus, on the death of an amiable'

young woman 191

4. On Discretion t3*

5. On the government of our thoughts 184

6. On the evils which flow from unrestrained passions ..... 136

7. On the proper state of our temper with respect to one another . 137

8. bxcellence of the Holy Scriptures . . r 138

9. Reflections occasioned by a review of the blessings, pronounced

fay Christ on his disciples, in his sermon on the mount ... 140

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.... 195

195

8. Adams advice to Ere, to avoid temptation, .... "* 196

9. On procrastination, ."".'**" 197

10. Tbj>t philosophy, which stops at secondary causes,

reproved, iom

<is^ ,M

Page

11. Indignant Mntlmenti on national prejudices and hatred;

and on slavery, 198

CHAPTER IV.

Descriptive Pieces.

See*. 1. Tie morning In summer, 300

2. Rural sounds, as well as rural sights, delightful, 201

3. The rose, 202

4. Care of birds'for their young, 202'

5. Liberty and slavery contrasted, 205

6. Charity. A paraphrase on the 18th chapter of the

First Epistle to the Corinthians, 204

7. Picture of a good man, 205

8. The pleasures of retirement, 207

9. The pleasure and benefit of an improved and well

directed imagination, 208

'- CHAPTER V. Pathetic Pieces. g*ct 1- The hermit, 209

2. The beggar's petition, 211

3. Unhappy close of life, 212

4. Elegy to pity, . . . . 212

6. Verses supposed to bewritten by Alexander Selkirk,

during his solitary abode in the Island of Juan

Fernandez, "". , 213

. 0. Gratitude, 2H

7. A roan perishing in the snow; from whence reflec

tions are raised on the miseries of life, 216

5. A morning hymn, 2YI

CHAPTER VI.
Promiscuous Pieces.

fleet . 1. Ode to content, 219

2. The shepherd and the philosopher, 220

8. The road to happiness open to all men, . * 222

4. The goodness of Providence, 223

A. The Creator's works attest his greatness, 223

6. Address to the Deity, 224

7. The pursuit of happiness often ill directed, *. . 225

8. The fire-side, 227

9. Providence vindicated in the present state of man, 229

10. Selfishness reproved, 230

11. Human frailty, 231

12. Ode to peace', 231

13. Ode to adversity, 232

14. The Creation required to praise its Author, 233

15. The universal prayer, 235

16. Conscience, 2*"

17. On an infant, 231

J8. The cuckoo, 231

19. Day. A pastoral in three parts, •. 233

20. The order of nature, .... .;.'... 211

4l. Confidence in Divine protectiony-. 2*1.

22. Hymn, on a review of the seasons, 245

S3. Ontolitude, - . "• 2lJ

■■■.. <«!>

FINIS.

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