History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the Continent

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Morgan and the Quebec prisoners reach New Jersey on parolo
49
Perplexity of the ministry 05
60
Lee is called to the North The Cherokees engage in war
62
Single legislative assembly disapproved of
68
The result of the campaign thus for
74
Loss of both parties
80
Washington retreats beyond the Delaware Intrigues of Lee
86
Congress adjourns to Baltimore Fortitude of Samuel Adams
88
What Europe expected The British army at New York
94
December 26 1776January 1777
100
n in the battle
106
Principles of the new constitutions for the states
112
Two bouses except in Pennsylvania and Georgia How elected
116
Public worship in the several states
122
American commissioners wait on Vergennes The Count de Aranda
128
American privateers Demands of England Vergennes answers
134
The people of Germany Frederic of Prussia Court of Vienna
140
Lees treason What was thought of him in Europe
146
Meigs at Sag Harbor Vengeful orders of Germain
152
Diversion by way of Lake Ontario Burgoyne meets a congress of Indians
158
Jane Maccrca and her assassin Conduct of Schuyler Success of Clinton
164
Advance of Arnold and flight of Indians and SaintLcger
170
Strength of his army
175
Howe crosses the Schuylkill The British take Philadelphia
181
Burgoyne holds a council of war and offers battle
187
Washington attacks the British by surprise
193
Congress and the commissioners 273
195
The wont of a general government keenly felt
199
The committee of states Mode of amending the confederation
205
His second advance lie still fears to attack Returns to Philadelphia
210
Conduct of Washington His enemies shrink back from their purpose
216
Burgoyncs troops detained Gist Heroism of Riddle
222
Switzerland The republic of the Netherlands
228
Charles Augustus of SaxeWeimar and bis ministers
234
His reproof of the theft of Arthur Lees papers
240
Conditions of the treaties between France and the United States
246
His friends in England
253
Free thought in France No free public opinion in Spain 238
259
The contest of opinions in the French cabinet
265
Mistakes of Howe as a general The spirit of congress
271
Washington pursues the British army
274
Defeat of the men of Wyoming Trials for treason
280
Lord Howe retires Result of the campaign Opinion of Washington
286
Loanoffice certificates paid by drafts on commissioners at Paris Trade blighted
292
How Russia would treat America
343
Russia and Prussia wish England should lose her colonies
349
The empress of Russia signs a declaration of neutral rights
355
The Netherlands design to join the armed neutrality
362
The American war transferred to the southern states 866
367
The attempt to take Savannah by storm fails
373
Clinton compels South Carolina to persevere for independence
379
He aims at Camden Junction with Porterfield
385
CHAPTER XXVI
391
Comwallis sequesters even debts due to patriots
395
Retreat of Comwallis The victories and clemency of Marion
401
Antagonism of Virginia and New England
407
Slavery in South Carolina and Georgia In Massachusetts
413
Decision of its supreme judicial court
419
Clinton gives up offensive operations
425
Andr6 consummates the bargain with Arnold
431
The rewards of Arnold The humiliation of Clinton
437
The rising demand for an efficient government
443
Washingtons appeal to George Mason
449
Defects of the confederation
455
CHAPTER I
461
John Adams as sole negotiator of peace 4ti3
464
Austria in vain offers to mediate
470
CHAPTER II
476
Morgan prepares for battle
483
CHAPTER III
489
Cornwallis pursued by Greene retreats to Wilmington
495
lie occupies Hobkirks Hill near Camden
498
The British retreat to Charleston
504
Cornwallis sends out two expeditions
510
European influence on the war 336
512
March of the joint army to the southward
516
Cornwallis surrenders his army as prisoners of war
522
The Dutch republic recognises American independence
528
Rockingham and his friends accept power
533
Oswald bears to Franklin a letter of Shelburne approved by the king 588
539
CHAPTER VL
545
How Oswalds commission was received by Franklin and Jay
551
The financial policy of Morris 657
558
Jay refuses the offer
564
Jay capitulates and attempts to negotiate directly with Shelburoo
567
Progress of the peace negotiation
573
John Adams claims the right of fishing near the coast
579
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Seite 410 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Seite 421 - ... on spreading the opportunities and advantages of education in the various parts of the country, and among the different orders of the people, it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates in all future periods of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them, especially the University at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns...
Seite 329 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
Seite 254 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me ; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy...
Seite 329 - ... truth is great and will prevail if left to herself; that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict, unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate, errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them...
Seite 224 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Seite 414 - ... hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on the face of the earth...
Seite 216 - SIR: — I find myself just able to hold the pen during a few minutes, and take this opportunity of expressing my sincere grief for having done, written, or said anything disagreeable to your Excellency. My career will soon be over, therefore justice and truth prompt me to declare my last sentiments. You are in my eyes the great and good man. May you long enjoy the love, veneration, and esteem of these States, whose liberties you have asserted by your virtues.
Seite 224 - You may swell every expense, and every effort, still more extravagantly ; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Seite 558 - Let me conjure you, then, if you have any regard for your country, concern for yourself, or posterity, or respect for me, to banish these thoughts from your mind, and never communicate, as from yourself or any one else, a sentiment of the like nature.

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