History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the Continent

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THE RETREAT FROM LONG ISLAND
63
Washington on the heights of Harlem His lines of defence
69
Greene reinforces Fort Washington
77
Congress adjourns to Baltimore Fortitude of Samuel Adams
88
What Europe expected The British army at New York
94
CHAPTER VIII
100
Battle of Princeton Mercer mortally wounded Washington in the battle
106
Sovereignty of the people Why America became republican
112
Two houses except in Pennsylvania and Georgia How elected
117
Virginia disestablishes the Anglican church The rule in New Jersey
123
American memorial and answer Policy of France and Spain
129
Florida Blanca
135
The Catholic princes discouraged the service Prince AnhaltZerbst
141
CHAPTER XII
156
Slavery forbidden The fight at Hubbardton
162
Rising of Herkimer and the German freeholders of the Mohawk valley
168
CHAPTER XIII
174
Strength of his army
179
CHAPTER XIV
192
Siege and evacuation of Mud Island
198
Jealousy of military not of naval power Foreign relations
204
Washington at Whitemarsh First advance of Howe Its failure
209
Patrick Henry his firm friend Attempt to mislead Lafayette
215
Washington on standing armies Unity of the country
221
Russia Sweden Denmark
227
Schiller The ruler of SaxeGotha
233
His reproof of the theft of Arthur Lees papers
240
Conditions of the treaties between France and the United States
246
His friends in England
253
Contrast between the French literature and the Spanish
259
The contest of opinions in the French cabinet
265
Mistakes of Howe as a general The spirit of congress
271
Washington pursues the British army
276
The rising cry for peace
282
Tryon recalled to New York
331
AMERICA IN EUROPE THE ARMED NEUTRALITY
337
Vergennes and Florida Blanca send agents to Ireland 841
343
Paul Jones enters a Dutch harbor with his prizes
350
She invites Sweden Denmark Portugal and the Netherlands to join
356
St Eustatius captured
363
Capture of Savannah Lincoln takes the command in the south
371
CHAPTER XXV
380
His illusions He detaches Sumter and eight hundred men His night march
386
Cornwallis introduces a reign of terror in South Carolina
393
THE RISE OF FREE COMMONWEALTHS
411
CHAPTER XXVIII
423
CHAPTER XXIX
439
United States deposit money in a bank
448
For unions sake Virginia surrenders lands to congress
454
CHAPTER I
461
John Adams as sole negotiator of peace
471
He obtains a separate command and the rank of brigadier
477
His victory over Tarleton at the Cowpens
485
He occupies Hobkirks Hill near Camden
498
The British retreat to Charleston
504
Cornwallis sends out two expeditions
510
European influence on the war 836
512
March of the joint army to the southward
516
Cornwallis surrenders his army as prisoners of war
522
The Dutch republic recognises American independence
528
Rockingham and his friends accept power
533
Franklin presents Grenville to Wergennes
539
spielburne strives sincerely for Peace
545
How Oswalds commission was received by Franklin and Jay
551
The financial policy of Morris
557
Wergennes willing to repress the United States
563
Jay capitulates and attempts to negotiate directly with Shelburne
567
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Seite 410 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Seite 421 - ... on spreading the opportunities and advantages of education in the various parts of the country, and among the different orders of the people, it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates in all future periods of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them, especially the University at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns...
Seite 329 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
Seite 254 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me ; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy...
Seite 329 - ... truth is great and will prevail if left to herself; that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict, unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate, errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them...
Seite 224 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Seite 414 - ... hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on the face of the earth...
Seite 216 - SIR: — I find myself just able to hold the pen during a few minutes, and take this opportunity of expressing my sincere grief for having done, written, or said anything disagreeable to your Excellency. My career will soon be over, therefore justice and truth prompt me to declare my last sentiments. You are in my eyes the great and good man. May you long enjoy the love, veneration, and esteem of these States, whose liberties you have asserted by your virtues.
Seite 224 - You may swell every expense, and every effort, still more extravagantly ; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Seite 558 - Let me conjure you, then, if you have any regard for your country, concern for yourself, or posterity, or respect for me, to banish these thoughts from your mind, and never communicate, as from yourself or any one else, a sentiment of the like nature.

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