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...City Collector's Office,

.1015 Salisbury st.
......113 South Sixteenth st.

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17th. THOMAS RICHESON.

1879

18th. JOHN J. HOLLIDAY.

1880

313 Carr st.

19th. THOMAS MOCKLER.

1879

......3536 Papin st.

20th. ROBERT M. JENNINGS...

1879

...... 1211 Garrison ave.

21st. ERNST BRUENEMANN

1880

.Cor. Jefferson av. & Chippewa st. .....417 Washington ave.

22d. MICHAEL J. MURPHY.

1878

23d. EDWARD DOWLING............

1878

......Near Baden.

24th, WILLIAM KNIGHT.

1880

......Near I. M. R. R. and Stein st.

25th. HENRY UDE........

1879

.Near Gravois R'd & King's High'y

26th, CHARLES S. RUSSELL.......

1879 ......N. W. cor. Seventh and Pine sts.

27th. MICHAEL FOERSTEL...

1880

....... Union Market.

28th. SAMUEL CUPPLES.

1879

N! E. cor. Second & Chestnut sts.

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT.

To the People of St. Louis :

In presenting herewith the annual report of the President and Board of Directors of the St. Louis public schools for the year ending July 31, 1877, I have deemed it proper to review in a brief manner the financial history of the Board for the past

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twelve years :

By the report of the Secretary (see appendix) the receipts and expenditures for the past year, omitting income from loans and bills receivable as well as expense incurred by payment of loans, are as follows:

RECEIPTS.

66

From rents.......

real estate sold.........
city school tax.
tuition .......
State school fund....

.$ 47,006 28

756 63 795,438 74

4,068 00 131,946 05

66

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66

Total......

$979,215 70 EXPENDITURES. For teachers' salaries (including Superintendents)..

$573,978 25 officers' (except Superintendents).

17,098 35 janitors'

48,453 80 supplies to the schools...

12,294 17 fuel....

14,428 91 gas.....

4,651 05 repairs and furniture..

35,912 62 “ real estate and improvements...

152,357 97 “ Public School Library.

13,400 00 general expenses (rent accounts, interest, taxes, printing, insurance, etc.).....

15,370 65 Total...........

.$887,945 77

By comparing the above items with the corresponding ones of the previous year, it will be seen that the receipts from rents have fallen off $3,268 74; from real estate sold, $1,718 37. The receipts from tuition (from pupils outside the city limits) have increased $1,178 50 ; from taxes, $33,911; from State school fund, $35,203 45. The expenditure for teachers' salaries has increased $19,974 18; for officers' salaries, $899 75; for janitors' salaries, $1,096 80.

Since the adoption of the new State Constitution the city tax for school purposes has been limited to four mills on the dollar with the privilege of assessing a tax of one mill additional for the purpose of paying debts that were created before the adoption of the Constitution. One-fifth of the receipts from the city, over $150,000, is, therefore, set apart to pay interest upon our bonded debt and to reduce the principal. Of the entire bonded debt, amounting to $550,000,

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The debt of $200,000 falling due in September, 1877, will be paid upon maturity from the proceeds of the one mill tax collected as a sinking fund. In order to do this it will be necessary to anticipate the receipts of the present year's taxes by a temporary loan which may be paid by January, 1878.

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The remaining sum of $350,000 of the bonded debt must be renewed. As it is the option of the Board to diminish the rate of taxation and collect a half or fourth of a mill on the dollar, instead of one mill (the rate levied the past year) it may be

advisable to proceed to the liquidation of our bonded debt more gradually. The financial stress that is now upon us makes it desirable to afford the tax payer such temporary relief as is in our power.

By the provisions of the State constitution all municipal corporations are prohibited from incurring indebtedness to an amount above the receipts of the year in which the indebtedness is created. It will be impossible hereafter for us to increase our bonded debt, or to anticipate the revenues of the ensuing year. Any tax assessed by the board, in amount above four mills on the dollar, must be appropriated to the payment of interest and the reduction of the bonded debt already existing. Under these circumstances it seems advisable to consider carefully the general interest of our tax-payers in the matter of reducing our debt. If it is an advantage to the community to be relieved from the necessary tax, and still more, an advantage to retain the capital represented by our debt among us (it was borrowed in Philadelphia), then reduce the tax and renew our bonds. It is a question of rate of interest on the debt as compared with the rate of interest that money is worth in our city.

If money is seeking investment here at six per cent., our taxpayers cannot afford to allow any branch of our city government to continue the payment of eight per cent. on money borrowed of Eastern capitalists.

There was a loating debt of some $250,000 carried by this board, in'addition to the bonded debt of $550,000, at the time of the adoption of the new constitution, all of which might have been funded and paid from the proceeds of the one-mill tax allowed for sinking fund. The board, however, has not availed itself of this privilege, but has appropriated its current revenues for the payment of this floating debt, and relieved the taxpayers from this extra burden.

By the report of the Superintendent the enrollment of pupils the past year is given as follows:

Number of pupils enrolled, day schools.....
Number of pupils enrolled, evening schools.....

42,436
5,240

Total...

47,676

The increase over the enrollment for the previous year is 4046 in the day schools. This does not include the increase of our system by the accession of sixteen new schools in our suburbs, through the extension of our city limits under the provisions of the new charter.

The number of teachers is given at 870, of whom 752 are employed in the day schools and 118 in the evening schools. This number however includes the teachers in the newly extended limits.

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.

The constitutional limitation of taxation for school purposes to the sum of four mills on each dollar assessed, and the withdrawal of the privilege to create debts, render it necessary to scrutinize very carefully the sources of our income and the probabilities of increase of expenditures.

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If our school system had attained its growth and were in the future to remain stationary, or to increase at a rate equal to, or slower than, the increase of the taxable property, real and personal, of this city, our future ability to provide for the schools upon the present scale would be assured. But a consideration of the following statistics will reveal the fact that

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