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Lord, we are sick, spotted with sin,
Thick as a crusty leper's skin;
Like Naaman, bid us wash: yet let it be
In streams of blood that flow from thee:
Then will we sing
Touch'd by the heav'nly Dove's bright wing,
Hallelujahs, psalms, and praise,
To God, the Lord of night and days;
Ever good, and ever just,
Ever high, who ever must
Thus be sung; is still the same;
Eternal praises crown his name !
Amen.

A Prayer for Charity.

FULL of mercy, full of love,
Look upon us from above;
Thou, who taught'st the blind man's night
To entertain a double light,
Thine and the day's (and that thine too);
The lame away his crutches threw;
The parched crust of leprosy
Return'd unto its infancy:
The dumb amazed was to hear
His own unchain'd tongue strike his ear;
Thy powerful mercy did even chase
The devil from his usurp'd place,
Where thou thyself shouldst dwell, not he.
O let thy love our pattern be;
Let thy mercy teach one brother
To forgive and love another;
That, copying thy mercy here,
Thy goodness may hereafter rear
Our souls unto thy glory, when
Our dust shall cease to be with men. Amen.

THE
PSALTER OF DAVID:

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TITLES AND COLLECTS, ACCORDING TO THE MATTER OF EACH PSALM : WHERE unto ARE ADDED

T) E V OTIONS

For The

HELP AND ASSISTANCE OF ALL CHRISTIAN PEOPLE, IN ALL OCCASIONS AND NECESSITIES.

THE PREFACE.

IT is natural for all men, when they are straitened with fears or actual infelicities, to run for succour to what their fancy, or the next opportunity, presents, as an instrument of their ease and remedy. But that which distinguishes men in these cases, is the choice of their sanctuary; for to rely upon the reeds of Egypt, or to snatch at the bulrushes of Nilus, may well become a drowning man, whose reason is so wholly invaded and surprised by fear, as to be useless to him in that confusion : but he whose condition (although it be sad) is still under the mastery of reason, and hath time to deliberate, unless he places his hopes upon something that is likely to cure his misery, or at least to ease it, by making his affliction less, or his patience more, does deserve that misery he groans under. Stripes and remediless miseries are the lot of fools; but afflictions, that happen to wise men or good men, represent indeed the sadnesses of mortality; but they become monuments and advantages of their piety and wisdom.

In this most unnatural war, commenced against the greatest solemnities of Christianity, and all that is called God, I have been put to it to run somewhither to sanctuary; but whither, was so great a question, that had not religion been my guide, I

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