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(William Setchel) The Oberlehrer,
527.

France, Relations between America

and, 105.
Function of graduate schools in the

universities of the United States,
433.

Education (Higher) in New York City,

211.
in Russia, Influence of the

war on, 325.
(physical) in American col-

leges. The influence of

athletics upon, 355.
(public), The state and the

city in, 397
Science in, 295.
The environment and, 139.
(The) of the immigrant, 469.

(The) of travel, 457.
Educational principles and the ele-

mentary schools, 342.
surveys, Some foreign,

106.
Efficiency in spelling, Tests of, 319.
Elementary pupils, Home work for,

360.
schools, Educational prin-

ciples and the, 342.
Emerson's (Olive Farrar) A middle

English reader, 99.
Emma Willard: A sketch and

Gary experiment in New York City,

A report on the, 8.
Genius (The) of ancient Greece and its

influence on the modern world, 399.
Graduate schools (Function of) in

the universities of the United

States, 433.
Greece (The genius of ancient) and

its influence on the modern world,

399.
Greenwood's (Arthur) The health and

physique of school children, 412.
Guidance (Vocational) in colleges and

universities, 331.

tion, 530.

a

HAMMETT, C. E.--The influence of

athletics upon physical education in

American colleges, 355.
High school hydra (The): A reply,

MANNY, FRANK A.-Annual Report for

1914 of the Chief
Medical Officer of

the Board of Ed-
KEPPEL, FREDERICK P.-Canby's
(Henry

ucation, England
S.) Col-

and Wales, 409.
lege sons

Annual Report on
and col-

the medical in-
lege fat-

spection of school
hers, 529.

children in Dum-
Boswell's

ferline, 411.
(Foster

Greenwood's (Ar-
P.) The

thur) The health
aims and

and physique of
defects of

school children,
college

412.
educa- Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

538.
KNAPP, CHARLES-Liberal studies in Maxwell, Superintendent, 423.
ancient Rome, 237.

MENDELSOHN, SIGMUND-National
KOLBE, PARKE R.-Some phases of preparedness and school efficiency,
field work, 478.

51,
KRAPP, GEORGE PHILIP-Cook's (Al- MERRILL, George A.--The high school

bert Stan- hydra: A reply, 198,
burrough) Method (The direct) and its applica-
A literary

letter, 387.
Engineering (Chemical) for

paper
makers, 522.
English, What is? 168.
Environment (The) and education,

139.
European secondary schools, The

teaching of modern languages in,

488.
Experiment (Gary) in New York

City, A report on the, 8,

198.
of commerce, Boston, The

new, 305.
Higher education in New York City,

tion to American schools,
m i ddle

447
English

(the direct) for a modern
reader, 99.

language, Why? 254.
Emer son's Methods of teaching at Annapolis, 149.

(Olive Far- Mijouer, PAUL-Influence of the war
rar) A mid-

on education in Russia, 325.
dle English Militarists and pacifists, 57.

Minnesota, The University of, 537.
W y 1 d's Modern language (a), Why the direct
(Henry

method for? 254.
Cecil) А

language course, The place of
short his

reading in the, 189.
tory of

languages (The teaching of)
English,

in European secondary
200.

schools, 488.
KRAUSE, Carl A.--Why the direct

tendencies, Some observa-
method for a modern language? 254.

tions on, 109.

world, The genius of ancient
LACY, Mary G.---The farmer and his

Greece and its influence on
tools, 268.

the, 399.
Language (a modern), Why the direct
method for? 254.

National preparedness and school
Language course (modern), The place efficiency, 51.
of reading in the, 189.

Nations (warring), The spirit of the,
Learned's (William Setchel) The Ober- 217
lehrer, 527:

New high school of commerce (The),
Lecture (Public) system in New York, Boston, 305.
428.

New York City, A report on the Gary
LENZ, FRANK B.--The education of the

experiment in, 8.
immigrant, 469.

Higher education in,
LEONARD, STERLING A.--The rationale

school system, Divi-
of punctuation: A criticism, 89.

sion of reference and
Liberal studies in ancient Rome, 237.

research in the, 212.
Lighty, W. H.--Correspondence-study

schools, 426.
teaching, 40.

211.

reader, 99.

Hitting the mark, Are our schools? 275.
HOFFMAN, ERNST-The spirit of the

warring nations, 217.
HOLDEN, JAMES A.-Emma Willard:

A sketch and a letter, 387.
Home work for elementary pupils, 360.
Horace: An appreciation, 156.
Howerth, I. W.-The environment

and education, 139.
Hydra, The bigh school: A reply, 198.

1

Faculty, A university president to the,

92.
Farmer (The) and his tools, 268.
Fellowship, The broken, 179.
Felter William L., Eaton (Jeanette)

and Stevens's (Bertha M.) Com-
mercial work and training for girls,

314.
Field work, Some phases of, 478.
FINLEY, JOHN H.--A camp for peace, I.
FITZPATRICK, FRANK A. Ballou's

(Frank Worth-
ington) The
appointment of
teachers in
cities, 526.
Butler's (Nich-

olas Murray)
Meaning of
education,

408.
Foreign (Some) educational surveys,

106.
students in American uni-

versities, 214.

Immigrant, The education of the, 469.
Influence of the war on education in

Russia, 325
on the modern world, The

genius of ancient Greece

and its, 399
(The) of athletics upon

physical education in

American colleges, 355.
Institutions (degree conferring) in

the District of Columbia, Control

of, 64.
Instructors (Biblical), The Associa-

tion of, 425.

211.

JENNINGS, IRWIN G.-Vocational

guidance in colleges and universi-

ties, 331.
Johns Hopkins University, 539.
JOHNSTON, JOSEPH HENRY-Learned's

New York, Public lecture system in,

428.
Notes and news, 105, 208, 318, 423,

537
Notes on new books, 101, 202, 317,

413, 531.

Observations (Some) on modern ten-

dencies, 109,
Opportunity (an), A problem and, 97.
Oregon, The University of, 430.
Pacifists, Militarists and, 57.
Pan-American Scientific Congress,

Second, 108.
Paper makers, Chemical engineering

for, 522.
Patriotism, 78.
PATTERSON, HERBERT-Educational
principles

and the elementary
schools, 342.
Peace, A camp for, 1.
Perry's (Arthur C.) Discipline as a

school problem, 316.
Phases (Some) of field work, 478.
Physical education in American col-

leges, The influence of athletics

upon, 355.
Place (The) of reading in the modern

language course, 189.
Power of type, 106.
Preparedness (National) and school

efficiency, 51.
President (A university) to the faculty,

92.
President Schurman's report, 323.
PRESTON, CARLETON E.- Are

schools hitting the mark? 275.
Princeton, Progress at, 424.
Principles (Educational) and the ele-

mentary schools, 342.
Problem (A) and an opportunity, 97.
Professors (University), The American

Association of, 310.
Progress at Princeton, 424.
Public education. The state and the

city in, 397.
lecture system in New York,

428.
Punctuation. The rationale of: A

criticism, 89.
Pupils (elementary), Home work for,

360.
Rationale (The) of punctuation: A

criticism, 89.
Reading in the modern language

course, The place of, 189.
Reference and research (Division of)

in the New York City school system,

212.
Relations between America and

France, 105.

Report (A) on the Gary experiment in

New York City, 8.

President Schurman's, 323.
Reviews, 99, 200, 314, 408, 526.
Rome (ancient), Liberal studies in,

237.
Russia, Influence of the war on educa-

tion in, 325
School efficiency, National prepared-

ness and, 51.
room window, The war from

the, 511.
superintendents, Two great,

208.
system (New York City), Di-

vision of reference and re-

search in, 212.
(The new high) of commerce,

Boston, 305.
Schools (American), The direct method

and its application to, 447.
(elementary), Educational

principles and the, 342.
(graduate), Function of, in

the universities of the United

States, 433.
hitting the mark, Are our? 275.

New York City, 426.
Schurman's (President) report, 323.
Science in education, 295.
Scientific Congress, Second Pan-Amer-

ican, 108.
Secondary schools (European), The

teaching of modern languages in,

488.
SMILEY, CHARLES Newton-Horace:

An appreciation, 156.
Smith College, 322.
Some foreign educational surveys, 106.

observations on modern ten-

dencies, 109.

phases of field work, 478.
Spelling, Tests of efficiency in, 319.
Spirit (The) of the warring nations,

217.
State (The) and the city in public

education, 397:

university, The American, 29.
STEPHENSON, J. NEWELL-Chemical

engineering for paper makers, 522.
STITT, EDWARD W.-Home work for

elementary pupils, 360.
Students (Foreign) in American uni-

versities, 214
Studies (Liberal) in ancient Rome, 237.
STURTEVANT, J. L.--The University

of Wisconsin: In rebuttal, 87.
Superintendent Maxwell, 423.
Superintendents (school), Two great,

208.
Surveys (educational), Some foreign,

106.

our

System (Public lecture) in New York,

428.
(New York City school), Di-

vision of reference and re-
search in, 212.

on

New York, Public lecture system in, Report (A) on the Gary experiment in

428.
Notes and news, 105, 208, 318, 423,

New York City, 8.

President Schurman's, 323.
537

Reviews, 99, 200, 314, 408, 526.
Notes on new books, 101, 202, 317, Rome (ancient), Liberal studies in,
413, 531.

237.

Russia, Influence of the war on educa.
Observations (Some) on modern ten-

tion in, 325.
dencies, 109.

School efficiency, National prepared.
Opportunity (an), A problem and, 97.

ness and, 51.
Oregon, The University of, 430.

room window, The war from

the, 511.
Pacifists, Militarists and, 57.

superintendents, Two great,
Pan-American Scientific Congress,

208.
Second, 108.

system (New York City), Di-
Paper makers, Chemical engineering

vision of reference and re-
for, 522.

search in, 212.
Patriotism, 78.

(The new high) of commerce,
PATTERSON, HERBERT-Educational

Boston, 305.
principles and the elementary Schools (American), The direct method
schools, 342.

and its application to, 447;
Peace, A camp for, 1.

(elementary), Educational
Perry's (Arthur C.) Discipline as a

principles and the, 342.
school problem, 316.

(graduate), Function of, in
Phases (Some) of field work, 478.

the universities of the United
Physical education in American col-

States, 433.
leges. The influence of athletics

hitting the mark, Are our? 275.
upon, 355.

New York City, 426.
Place (The) of reading in the modern Schurman's (President) report, 323.
language course, 189.

Science in education, 295.
Power of type, 106.

Scientific Congress, Second Pan-Amer-
Preparedness (National) and school ican, 108.
efficiency, 51.

Secondary schools (European), The
President (A university) to the faculty, teaching of modern languages in,
92.

488.
President Schurman's report, 323. SMILEY, CHARLES NEWTON–Horace:
PRESTON, CARLETON E.-Are

An appreciation, 156.
schools hitting the mark? 275. Smith College, 322.
Princeton, Progress at, 424.

TAYLOR, JOSEPH S.-A report

the Gary experiment in New York

City, 8.
Teaching at Annapolis, Methods of,

149.
Correspondence-study, 40.
(The) of modern languages

in European secondary

schools, 488.
Technology, Massachusetts Institute

of, 538.
Tendencies (modern) Some observa-

tions on, 109.
Tests of efficiency in spelling, 319.
THALLON, IDA M.-The genius of

ancient Greece and its influence on

the modern world, 399.
THWING, CHARLES F.—The education

of travel, 457.
Tools, The farmer and his, 268.
TOWNSEND, H. G.-Science in educa-

tion, 295
Travel, The education of, 457.
Two great school superintendents,

208.
Type, Power of, 106.
United States, Function of graduate

schools in the universities of the,

433

our

Universities (American), Foreign stu-

dents in, 214.
(colleges and), Vocational

Professors, The American

Association of, 310.
The American state, 29.
(The) of Minnesota, 537.
(The) of Oregon, 430.
(The) of Wisconsin: In

rebuttal, 87.

VAIL, THEODORE N.-Some observa-

tions on modern tendencies, 109.
Vocational guidance in colleges and

universities, 331.

Some foreign educational surveys, 106.

observations on modern ten.
Principles (Educational) and the ele-
mentary schools, 342.

dencies, 109.
Problem (A) and an opportunity, 97. phases of field work, 478.
Professors (University), The American Spelling, Tests of efficiency in, 319.

Association of, 310. Spirit (The) of the warring nations,
Progress at Princeton, 424.

217
Public education, The state and the State (The) and the city in public
city in, 397.

education, 397.
lecture system in New York, university, The American, 29.
428.

STEPHENSON, J. NEWELL-Chemical
Punctuation, The rationale of: A engineering for paper makers, 522.
criticism, 89.

STITT, EDWARD W.-Home work for
Pupils (elementary), Home work for, elementary pupils, 360.
360.

Students (Foreign) in American uni.
Rationale (The) of punctuation: A versities, 214.
criticism, 89.

Studies (Liberal) in ancient Rome, 237.
Reading in the modern language Sturtevant, J. L.-The University
course, The place of, 189.

of Wisconsin: In rebuttal, 87.
Reference and research (Division of) Superintendent Maxwell, 423.
in the New York City school system, Superintendents (school), Two great,

208.
212.
Relations between America and Surveys (educational), Some foreign,
France, 105.

106.

War (The) from the schoolroom

window, 511.
(Influence of the) on education

in Russia, 325.
WARD, C. H.-What is English? 168.
Warring nations, The spirit of the, 217.
WESTCOTT, ALLAN F.—Methods of

teaching at Annapolis, 149.
What is English? 168.
WHEELER, BENJAMIN IDE—The Amer-

ican state university, 29.
WHITNEY, MARIAN P.—The place of

reading in the modern language

course, 189.
Why the direct method for a modern

language? 254.
Willard (Emma): A sketch and a

letter, 387.
Wisconsin, The University of: In

rebuttal, 87.
Work (Home) for elementary pupils,

360.
World (modern), The genius of ancient

Greece and its influence on the, 399.
Wyld's (Henry Cecil) A short history

of English, 200.
YOUNG, MARY VANCE-A problem and

an opportunity, 97.
ZICK, HENRY—The teaching of modern

languages in European secondary
schools, 488.

guidance in, 331.
of the United States,

Function of graduate

schools in the, 433.
University president (A) to the faculty,

92.

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A CAMP FOR PEACE I have come to bring to you of the city where the first constitution of the state was completed the proud greetings of the state, thru its incorporeal university, which was itself established in 1784 and which gave charter to the two acadèmies now merged in this school, in 1795–one hundred and twenty years ago--a university which has no teachers, no students, an Alma Mater who has no children except immortal corporations, but an educational providence who has a loving, watchful, beneficent interest in every child of the state, every school, every college, every university; who, in her library remembers the past and in her museum the longer past, before men came upon the earth-tho it is difficult to believe that there was ever a time when Clintons and Hasbroucks and Schoonmakers and Clearwaters were not on the earth,--when the only Michael was an archangel, when megatheriums wandered in tangled forests and Adam and Eve had not yet compelled the human race to labor and to celebrate their respite by a labor day.

I have come to tell you the gratitude of the state for what you have added to her wealth, for what you are bringing into the state university.

Chesterton says that democracy is ever dreaming of kings, and will not be content till she has a nation of kings; that she edurries a man not because he is so miserable but because

xtracts from an address delivered at the dedication of the new sctrony: ouilding at Kingston, N. Y., on September 6, 1915.

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