History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent [to 1789], Band 4

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discourages Importations 76 Du Châtelet goes to England as Ambassador
82
approves the Measures of Massachusetts 84 The Thirteenth Parliament
85
Meeting and Bernard 91 The Crown Officers report an Insurrection 92
96
British Cabinet towards America 100 Boston celebrates the Fourteenth
104
The Coming of Troops announced 110 Boston TownMeeting
111
CHAPTER XXXVII
117
CHAPTER XXXVIII
125
Stuart negotiates a Boundary with the Cherokees 127 Treaty with the
131
CHAPTER XXXIX
138
Debate in the House of Commons 143 Speculations of the Statesmen
147
wish its Independence 149 Contrast of England and Spain 150 Firmness
157
Supplies to the Troops 162 Agreement of the Merchants not to import
163
CHAPTER XLII
171
Inactivity of the Troops 176 Botetourt in Virginia promises a partial Repeal
178
Troops supplied with Ammunition 181 Conflict with the Troops
187
The Troops ordered to leave the Town
194
Character of George III 197 State of Parties in England 199 Character
205
the Provincial Fortress to the British General 207 Trial of Preston 209
209
on the Watauga 213 The Regulators of North Carolina 214 Husbands
215
Friends join the British Ministry 217 Choiseul dismissed 217 Grievances
222
GREAT BRITAIN CENTRES IN ITSELF POWER OVER ITS COLONIES HILLS
237
January 1773
252
the Massachusetts Assembly to discuss the Supreme Power of Parliament
253
Council of Massachusetts 254 Of the House 254 The Commissioners
263
prepares Resistance 266 He plans a Congress 266 Secret Circular 269
269
more TeaShips 276 The Boston Committee require the TeaShips to be sent
280
the Lords of Council 289 Debate in the House of Lords 289 Franklin still
290
Unanimous Address to the King 296 Penal Measures against
298
Samuel Adams 301 Position of Edmund Burke 303 New York TeaShip
306
founded on a Universal Principle 312 Most cherished in America 312 Brit
316
lar to the Colonies 322 Boston TownMeeting 323 Gage arrives 323
325
Thought of New York 330 Zeal of Connecticut 331 Hutchinsons Address
332
Its Burgesses appoint a Fast 336 House dissolved 336 Meeting
335
The New League and Covenant 341 Nonintercourse with
343
Uncertainty of Gage p 399 Determined Resistance of New England
400
sachusetts to the Acts of Parliament 406 The Declaration of Rights 406
406
CHAPTER XIV
412
CHAPTER XV
418
Great Indian Battle 424 Victory of the Virginians 424 The Vir
423
ency of Burke 429 His Election at Bristol 429 William Howe returned
435
Lord Howe negotiates with Franklin 438 Franklins
441
Their Union 446 Their Independence 446 Their Spirit of Liberty 447
447
CHAPTER XX
462
CHAPTER XXII
478
CHAPTER XXIII
485
Johnson on his Deathbed 493 Wesley for the Court 494 Camden speaks
496
CHAPTER XXV
502
Henry proposes a Posture of Defence 505 Objections 506 Reply of Patrick
508
514 Increasing Confidence of the King 515 Great Expectation throughout
514
CHAPTER XXVIII
523
The Americans give Chase 529 Pursuit through Lincoln 529
529
The People of Massachusetts rush to the Camp 534 Men of New Hampshire
536
The Camp of Liberty 541 Want of Military Stores 541 Proposed
542
VOL IV
545
from Massachusetts and Connecticut 548 Spirit of New Jersey 549
551
EFFECTS OF THE DAY OF LEXINGTON AND CONCORD CONTINUED TICON
552
CHAPTER XXXIII
558
Discontent of Lord North 561 Meeting of the Cabinet 561
566
CHAPTER XXXV
572
Government of their own 578 They publish their Resolves to the World
579
inson advocates a Second Petition to the King 581 Hancock chosen President
582
Shelburnes Opinion on the Answer 588 Vergennes 589 Massachu
588
His Early Life 594 His Courage 594 Cheerfulness 595 Liberality 595
595
CHAPTER XXXVIII
601
Surprise of the British 605 Prescott strengthens his Defences 606 Gage
608
Number of the Americans 614 Free Negroes in the Battle 614
614
The Third Attack on the Redoubt p 619 Resistance of the Americans
620
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Seite 460 - THE SACRED RIGHTS OF MANKIND ARE NOT TO BE RUMMAGED FOR AMONG OLD PARCHMENTS OR MUSTY RECORDS. THEY ARE WRITTEN, AS WITH A SUNBEAM, IN THE WHOLE VOLUME OF HUMAN NATURE, BY THE HAND OF THE DIVINITY ITSELF ; AND CAN NEVER BE ERASED OR OBSCURED BY MORTAL POWER.
Seite 500 - Let the colonies always keep the idea of their civil rights associated with your government, they will cling and grapple to you ; and no force under heaven will be of power to tear them from their allegiance.
Seite 499 - Then, Sir, from these six capital sources: of descent, of form of government, of religion in the northern provinces, of manners in the southern, of education, of the' remoteness of situation from the first mover of government — from all these causes a fierce spirit of liberty has grown up.
Seite 498 - And pray, Sir, what in the world is equal to it? Pass by the other parts, and look at the manner in which the people of New England have of late carried on the whale fishery.
Seite 500 - English communion that gives all their life and efficacy to them. It is the spirit of the English constitution which, infused through the mighty mass, pervades, feeds, unites, invigorates, vivifies, every part of the empire, even down to the minutest member.
Seite 447 - When your lordships look at the papers transmitted us from America, when you consider their decency, firmness, and wisdom, you cannot but respect their cause, and wish to make it your own.
Seite 447 - ... has been my favorite study— I have read Thucydides and have studied and admired the master states of the world— that for solidity of reasoning, force of sagacity, and wisdom of conclusion, under such a complication of difficult circumstances, no nation or body of men can stand in preference to the general congress at Philadelphia.
Seite 359 - The abolition of domestic slavery is the great object of desire in those colonies where it was unhappily introduced in their infant state. But, previous to the enfranchisement of the slaves we have, it is necessary to exclude all further importations from Africa ; yet our repeated attempts to effect this by prohibitions, and by imposing duties which might amount to a prohibition, have been hitherto defeated by his majesty's negative, thus preferring the immediate advantage of a few British corsairs...
Seite 500 - All this, I know well enough, will sound wild and chimerical to the profane herd of those vulgar and mechanical politicians, who have no place among us ; a sort of people who think that nothing exists but what is gross and material ; and who therefore, far from being qualified to be directors of the great movement of empire, are not fit to turn a wheel in the machine.
Seite 408 - We will neither import nor purchase, any slave imported after the first day of December next ; after which time, we will wholly discontinue the slave trade, and will neither be concerned in it ourselves, nor will we hire our vessels, nor sell our commodities or manufactures to those who are concerned in it.

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