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RECEIPTS.

Balance on hand, August 1, 1880,
Ordinary Current Revenue received,
Taxes of 1881, received,
Deferred Income, paid by sureties of J. P. Kreiger,

$ 23,234 22
821,460 64
48,919 10
11,584 40

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Balance on hand August 1, 1881,

$ 94,040 49 This gratifying exhibit, far exceeding that presented for many years past, though to some extent due to the increase of the Board's revenues from revival of business prosperity, is mainly the result of the judicious reforms inaugurated by the “Retrenchment Committee” in 1879, and the strict economy in expenditure and preservation of its sources of revenue in their integrity, which have since characterized the action of the Board.

A tabulated comparative statement is herewith submitted, giving the items of receipts and expenditures included in this fund since 1877:

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RECEIPTS.

Four Mill Tax.
Rents of Real Estate
State School Fund.
+Bills receivable..
Int'est on Bills receivable

Current Deposits
Kindergarten Sup. Fees.
Tuition Non-residents..
Miscellaneous..

1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.

1881.
$655,995 73 $714,990 59 $676,074 50 $667,707 64 $720,043 59

47,006 28 47,427 10 50,285 65 51,819 54 52,086 13
*131,946 05 85,117 07 71,268 85 74,725 80 76,063 29
42,003 59 46,907 65 42,427 04 18,217 87 7,987 85
5,227 80 10,300 12 10,165 70 7,475 56 4,224 03

2,778 63 5,863 37 3,228 00 5,097 80

5,374 10 890 00 485 00 343 75 342 50 137 00 23,548 63 24,353 68 1,393 50 1,424 13 1,102 59 909,846 08 934,679 01 851,958 99 824,491 67 872,881 95

Total..

* Includes the amount apportioned to the City and County of St. Louis.

† For the years prior to 1881, the "bills receivable” include both principal and interest notes. Since August, 1880, only "interest” notes are included.

EXPENDITURES.

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1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.

1881.
$564,478 25 $607.929 25 $623,630 85 $594,410 95 $585,456 95

48,453 80 53,537 30 57,450 05 56,938 65 56,319 60
26,598 35 27,162 35 23,654 55 22,900 00 23,036 25
28,334 81 36,782 94 35,586 08 33,323 11 37,986 13
14,428 91 7,012 63 13,994 99 12,904 97
4,651 05

15,999 67 5,120 11 6,099 95 5,565 02 5,196 27 12,294 17 23,874 32 13,643 93

13,031 79 4,296 45

4,207 56 3,469 18 5,674 60 6,090 00 5,881 45 6,072 95 13,400 00 12,999 50 10,800 00 13,508 00 11,000 00

7,577 81 12,913 42 7,581 65 5,477 61 5,257 92 12,023 21 15,111 11 6,228 29 5,957 51 6,534 23

5,693 40 5,500 00 800 00 997 77 812 35 3,279 13 323 93 804 27 2,017 09 331 80 4,006 34 8,787 45 1,598 04 1,977 74 278 82 1.322 45

1,086 18 417 56 1,490 25 1,182 25 1,275 8+ 29 25

29 25 4,784 65 5,944 87 4,080 28 3,132 50 3,543 73

3,432 00 1,913 50 2,827 00

1,282 49 1,430 26 1,531 77 746,977 04 816,667 62 829, 132 27 792, 102 13

772,915 60 152,357 97 175,902 93 58,208 55 1,501 92 11,953 00 899,335 01 992,570 55

887,340 82 793,604 05 784, 868 60

Grand Total..

It will be seen, from the above table, that the current expenses of the schools have been reduced over $56,000 since 1879; and it is worthy of note, that, during the same period, the average number of pupils belonging to the Day Schools has increased from 35,860 to 37,877. These results forcibly illustrate the wisdom of the “retrenchment” measures inaugurated in 1879.

While our current expenses will increase with the growth of the schools, with new school accommodations, and the rise in price of labor and material, our revenues must also increase with business prosperity, and higher assessments of property for taxation. With the large surplus on hand, and with prudent, judicious and economical management, no difficulty need be apprehended in supporting the schools, and, as will be seen hereafter, in providing all necessary school accommodations.

IV. THE BUILDING FUND. This fund differs from the foregoing in that it exists, not by force of law, but is a creation of the Board, and its receipts are really taken from the general revenues of the Board. Under the Constitution of the State, a special tax for erection of new school buildings may be authorized to be levied, by vote of two-thirds of the qualified voters. This Board, however, has never attempted to avail itself of this provision, and has provided new school accommodations from its general revenues available for that purpose.

* Prior to 1881 included in “Supplies Proper."

In addition to appropriations from the surplus current revenues of the Board, this fund includes: first, the township bills receivable, received under the Scheme of Separation on behalf of the school districts lying within the extended limits of the City, which belonged to townships intersected by the new city line; and second, the bills receivable representing deferred payments on all real estate sold by the Board prior to the enactment of the law of May 16, 1879; and third, proceeds of all sales of lands not belonging to the permanent fundas lands heretofore purchased by the Board for school sites, and not improved. Thus, during the past year, the receipts and disbursement of this fund were as follows:

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Total Cash and Bonds in Fund August 1, 1881, $37,267 61

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The following statement will show the amount expended by the Board for new school sites and school buildings during each year, from August 1, 1863 :

,

, For the year ending August 1, 1864,

$7,702 1865,

6,051 1866,

66,979 1867,

149,476 1868,

135,761 1869,

439,682 1870,

191,895 1871,

197,313 1872,

152,698 1873,

133,904 1874,

18,888 1875,

44,345 1876,

21,388 1877,

152,357 1878,

175,902 1879,

58,208 1880,

1,501 1881,

11,953

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Total,

$1,965,003 It will be seen from the foregoing table that during the past three years, but a small amount, comparatively, has been expended in providing new school accommodations, and to this fact is doubless largely due the improved financial condition of the Board. The total seating capacity of the schools owned and rented by the Board was 42,560, and the average number belonging to the day schools during the past year was 37,877, and from this point of view alone, the present accommodations would seem to be ample. But this is not the only consideration. The city has a widely-extended area, some portions thinly settled, and school facilities of rural or suburban character are required in a large section. Some of our schools are unfortunately located, and the shifting of population constantly going on, causes some

of the schools, particularly in the western part of the city, to be overcrowded. These conditions, and the conflicting and sometimes unreasonable demands of local interests render this question one of the most embarrassing in our school management.

During the past year the Board contracted for the erection of a twelve room building on the site owned by the Board on the corner of Bell street and Channing avenue in the western part of the city, and a six-room building on Wyoming street and Jefferson avenue, in the southern portion of the city. A site was purchased at Lowell, and

. preparations made for erecting a six room building thereon. A site was also purchased at Cheltenham. The Board is now advertising for a school site for the erection of a twelve room building in the north-western section

. of the city, west of St. Louis Park. A two room building, known as the Arlington School, near Rinkleville, was finished during the year.

The balance on hand in Building Fund, Aug. 1, 1881, was $37,266.61. In addition, the Board has appropriated from revenues of present year, the sum of $50,000, making a total of $87,267.61, which, it is believed, will be sufficient for completion of all the buildings above named.

The buildings thus now, or about to be erected will meet all pressing immediate wants. At an early date, however, the growth of the southwestern part of the city will require new accommodations in the Compton Hill district, and it would be a wise policy for the Board to secure an eligible site as soon as practicable. Before the beginning of the school year of 1882-3, some provision must be made in view of the sale of the old and badly located Gamble School. This want can probably be supplied by erecting an addition to the New Madison School or to the Laclede School, and redistricting, if necessary. This district, now supplied in part by the Gamble School, is largely occupied by business property and is not increasing in population, and it would be diffi

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