Myths and Legends of Japan

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Cosimo, Inc., 1 de abr. de 2007 - 436 páginas
Nowadays Japan is seen as a modern and technologically innovative place, but in 1913, when Myths and Legends of Japan was first published, its culture seemed strange and exotic to the average Westerner. With this collection, F. Hadland Davis uses folklore to bring Japanese civilization to life and introduce this alien society to a Western audience. Davis arranges myths into 31 categories, including heroes and warriors, legends of Mount Fuji, animal legends, superstitions, and legends of the sea. Each chapter contains numerous examples of the genre, making for a volume packed with stories that will entertain both the Japan enthusiast and the mythology buff. FREDERICK HADLAND DAVIS is also the author of The Persian Mystics: Jalalu'd-Din Rumi (1907) and The Persian Mystics: Jami (1908), both available from Cosimo.

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FESTIVALS
220
THE PEONYLANTERN
231
Kōbō Daishi Nichiren and Shōdo Shonin
234
FANS
243
THUNDER
250
ANIMal LegendS
255
BIRD AND INSECT Legends
276
CONcerning TeA
290

THE STAR LOVERS AND THE ROBE OF FEATHERS
126
LEGENDS of Mount Fuji
130
BELLS
140
YUKIONNa the Lady of the SnoW
149
FLOWERS and Gardens
154
TREES
174
MIRRORS
190
KWANNON AND BENTEN DAIKOKU Ebisu and HOTEI
199
DOLLs and Butterflies
214
THree MaidenS
313
LEgends of the Sea
323
XXVIII SUperstitions
342
A NOTE ON JAPANESE POETRY
380
Gods and Goddesses
387
Genealogy OF THE AGE of the GoDS
393
INDEX OF POETICAL QUOTATIONS
402
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Página 117 - I have learned a little about the real structure of nature, of animals, plants, trees, birds, fishes, and insects. In consequence, when I am eighty, I shall have made still more progress. At ninety I shall penetrate the mystery of things ; at a hundred I shall certainly have reached a marvellous stage ; and when I am a hundred and ten everything I do, be it but a dot or a line, will be alive.
Página 316 - THE MAIDEN OF KATSUSHIKA Where in the far-off eastern land The cock first crows at dawn, The people still hand down a tale Of days long dead and gone. They tell of Katsushika's maid, Whose sash of country blue Bound but a frock of home-spun hemp, And kirtle coarse to view ; Whose feet no shoe had e'er confined, Nor comb passed through her hair; Yet all the queens in damask robes Might nevermore compare With this dear child, who smiling stood, A flow'ret of the spring — In beauty perfect and complete,...
Página 323 - Tis spring, and the mists come stealing O'er Suminoye's shore, And I stand by the seaside musing On the days that are no more. I muse on the old-world story, As the boats glide to and fro, Of the fisher-boy, Urashima, Who a-fishing...
Página 57 - ... was not one to be seen, and if she went to look for one she would lose the peach. Stopping a moment to think what she would do, she remembered an old charm-verse. Now she began to clap her hands to keep time to the rolling of the peach down stream, and while she clapped she sang this song : " Distant water is bitter, The near water is sweet ; Pass by the distant water And come into the sweet.
Página 291 - Johnson draws his own portrait as "a hardened and shameless tea-drinker, who for twenty years diluted his meals with only the infusion of the fascinating plant; who with tea amused the evening, with tea solaced the midnight, and with tea welcometh the morning.
Página 127 - Chiming in unison, the angels' lutes, Tabrets and cymbals and silv'ry flutes, " Ring through the heav'n that glows with purple hues, As when Someiro's western slope endues The tints of sunset, while the azure wave From isle to isle the pine-clad shores doth lave, From Ukishima's slope, — a beauteous storm, — Whirl down the flow'rs; and still that magic form...
Página 291 - I would therefore in a very particular manner recommend these my speculations to all well-regulated families, that set apart an hour in every morning for tea and bread and butter; and would earnestly advise them for their good to order this paper to be punctually served up, and to be looked upon as a part of the tea equipage.
Página 198 - Then the man understood and loved his child the more for her filial piety. Even the girl's stepmother, when she knew what had really taken place, was ashamed and asked forgiveness. And this child, who believed she had seen her mother's face in the mirror, forgave, and trouble forever departed from the home.
Página 224 - Seldom more than two feet in length are these boats; but the dead require little room. And the frail craft are launched on canal, lake, sea, or river — each with a miniature lantern glowing at the prow, and incense burning at the stern. And if the night be fair, they voyage long. Down all the creeks and rivers and canals the phantom fleets go glimmering to the sea; and all the sea sparkles to the horizon with the lights of the dead, and the sea wind is fragrant with incense.

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