Myths and Legends of Japan

Capa
Cosimo, Inc., 2007 - 436 páginas
Nowadays Japan is seen as a modern and technologically innovative place, but in 1913, when Myths and Legends of Japan was first published, its culture seemed strange and exotic to the average Westerner. With this collection, F. Hadland Davis uses folklore to bring Japanese civilization to life and introduce this alien society to a Western audience. Davis arranges myths into 31 categories, including heroes and warriors, legends of Mount Fuji, animal legends, superstitions, and legends of the sea. Each chapter contains numerous examples of the genre, making for a volume packed with stories that will entertain both the Japan enthusiast and the mythology buff. FREDERICK HADLAND DAVIS is also the author of The Persian Mystics: Jalalu'd-Din Rumi (1907) and The Persian Mystics: Jami (1908), both available from Cosimo.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Comentário do usuário  - Spoonbridge - LibraryThing

"Myths and Legends of Japan" is an interesting collection of diverse Japanese folk tales, legends, and mythology, including a variety of topics from animal stories to legends of Mount Fuji, as well as ... Ler resenha completa

LibraryThing Review

Comentário do usuário  - EustaciaTan - LibraryThing

Even though this was written over a hundred years ago, it is till by far the best collection of Japanese myths and legends I've seen. Organised chronologically, then topically, this book aims, and ... Ler resenha completa

Conteúdo

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Página 55 - ... was not one to be seen, and if she went to look for one she would lose the peach. Stopping a moment to think what she would do, she remembered an old charm-verse. Now she began to clap her hands to keep time to the rolling of the peach down stream, and while she clapped she sang this song : " Distant water is bitter, The near water is sweet ; Pass by the distant water And come into the sweet.

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