Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics

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University of Chicago Press, 15 de dez. de 1983 - 271 páginas
This book, which Foucault himself has judged accurate, is the first to provide a sustained, coherent analysis of Foucault's work as a whole.

To demonstrate the sense in which Foucault's work is beyond structuralism and hermeneutics, the authors unfold a careful, analytical exposition of his oeuvre. They argue that during the of Foucault's work became a sustained and largely successful effort to develop a new method—"interpretative analytics"—capable fo explaining both the logic of structuralism's claim to be an objective science and the apparent validity of the hermeneutical counterclaim that the human sciences can proceed only by understanding the deepest meaning of the subject and his tradition.

"There are many new secondary sources [on Foucault]. None surpass the book by Hubert Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. . . . The American paperback edition contains Foucault's 'On the Genealogy of Ethics,' a lucid interview that is now our best source for seeing how he construed the whole project of the history of sexuality."—David Hoy, London Review of Books

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Sobre o autor (1983)

Hubert Lederer Dreyfus was born in Terre Haute, Indiana on October 15, 1929. He received a bachelor's degree in philosophy in 1951, a master's degree in 1952, and a doctorate in 1964 from Harvard University. He taught at Brandeis University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before joining the philosophy department at the University of California, Berkeley in 1968. He wrote or co-wrote numerous books during his lifetime including Alchemy and Artificial Intelligence, What Computers Can't Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason, Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics written with Paul Rabinow, Mind Over Machine: The Power of Human Intuition and Expertise in the Era of the Computer, What Computers Still Can't Do, Philosophy: The Latest Answers to the Oldest Questions, All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age written with Sean D. Kelly, and Skillful Coping: Essays on the Everyday Phenomenology of Everyday Perception and Action. He and Mark Wrathall edited numerous guides devoted to existentialism, phenomenology, and Heidegger's philosophy. He died of cancer on April 22, 2017 at the age of 87.

Paul Rabinow (1944-2021) was a professor of anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. nbsp;

Michel Foucault was born on October 15, 1926, in Poitiers, France, and was educated at the Sorbonne, in Paris. He taught at colleges all across Europe, including the Universities of Lill, Uppsala, Hamburg, and Warsaw, before returning to France. There he taught at the University of Paris and the College of France, where he served as the chairman of History of Systems of Thought until his death. Regarded as one of the great French thinkers of the twentieth century, Foucault's interest was in the human sciences, areas such as psychiatry, language, literature, and intellectual history. He made significant contributions not just to the fields themselves, but to the way these areas are studied, and is particularly known for his work on the development of twentieth-century attitudes toward knowledge, sexuality, illness, and madness. Foucault's initial study of these subjects used an archaeological method, which involved sifting through seemingly unrelated scholarly minutia of a certain time period in order to reconstruct, analyze, and classify the age according to the types of knowledge that were possible during that time. This approach was used in Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason, for which Foucault received a medal from France's Center of Scientific Research in 1961, The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, and The Archaeology of Knowledge. Foucault also wrote Discipline and Punishment: The Birth of the Prison, a study of the ways that society's views of crime and punishment have developed, and The History of Sexuality, which was intended to be a six-volume series. Before he could begin the final two volumes, however, Foucault died of a neurological disorder in 1984.

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