Heavy Weather Avoidance and Route Design: Concepts and Applications of 500 MB Charts

Capa
Paradise Cay Publications, 2008 - 246 páginas
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In Heavy Weather Avoidance, Chen and Chesneau merge the seamanship of a master mariner and the forecast expertise of a senior meteorologist, providing readers with double-barrel exposure to what actually goes on in the atmosphere and on the sea's surface. Mariners and recreational sailors are more concerned about the implications of volatile weather rather than its fluid dynamics. From start to finish the authors have cut to the chase, creating a readable text brimming with useful graphics. It's focused on the root cause of how and why bad weather develops and where it's likely to go. There's enough theory provided for a reader to get a feel for how air mass energy transfer works, but just as the theoretical aspect takes on a mission of its own, there's a shift to more practical self-forecasting and storm avoidance wisdom. Captain Ma-Li Chen shares his well-tested routing strategy and describes how it factors in the use of the 500 Mb chart.
 

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Conteúdo

Introduction to Basic Concepts
3
The Basic Structure of 500 Mb UpperLevel Air Charts
5
Principles and Applications of 500 Mb UpperLevel Air Charts
13
32 Basic Features of Streamlines
17
33 Long and ShortWave Troughs
18
34 Strong Wind Belts Jet Streams
24
35 CutOff Lows and CutOff Highs
27
Basic Characteristics of 500 Mb Upper Air Charts
31
141 Dumbbell Effect
101
142 Assimilation Effect
102
143 Explosion Effect
103
Tropical Cyclone Analysis
107
Tropical Cyclone Kinna 9117
116
Tropical Cyclone Gary
123
Introduction to Route Design Examples
127
Classification of Routes
131

42 Predicting Which Way a Cyclone Intensity
37
43 Predicting Which Way a Cyclone Will Move
40
44 Relationship Between UpperLevel Low Center
43
45 Formation and Movement of the UpperLevel Low Center
45
46 UpperLevel Cold Area
47
Basic Principles and Forecast Applications for Tropical Cyclones
49
Relationship Between 500 Mb UpperLevel Charts and Temperature
55
Flow Patterns and Distribution of Features Within the Specialized Strong Wind Belt
59
71 Zonal Flow
60
72 Zonal Flow Displaced Southward
61
73 Meridional Flow
63
74 Blocking Pattern
64
75 Omega Block
65
76 CutOffTrapped UpperLevel Low
66
77 Narrow in the West Wide in the East
68
78 Narrow in the East Wide in the West
70
Route Design and Applications of 500 Mb UpperLevel Charts
73
Navigation Zones and Route Planning
75
82 Determining the Best Route Design
78
UpperLevel Strong Wind Belt Position and Its Relationship
79
Relationship Between the UpperLevel Strong Wind Belt and Ships Motion
81
102 Latitudinal Shift of Eastbound Shipping
82
Major Considerations for Route Design
83
112 Ship Characteristics and Loading Conditions
85
113 Meteorological Conditions and Route Designs
86
General Strategy for Ocean Route Design
89
Practical Application of Atlantic and Pacific HighFrequency Facsimile Weather Charts
91
132 Pacific Ocean
94
133 Marking 500 Mb UpperLevel Charts
96
Transformation due to Two Cyclones Close to Each Other
99
Further Discussions of the Distance Factor
143
182 Pacific and Atlantic Ocean Route Designs
144
183 The Concept of Route Distance
145
184 The Unit Used to Decide the Distance Difference Between Routes
147
Further Discussion of Weather Conditions
149
192 Evaluation of the Weather Loss Rate for a Single Cyclone
154
193 Producing the Reference Table for the Weather Loss Rate
158
194 Summary of the Reference Table for Weather Loss Rate
163
195 Discussing the Weather Loss Rate in the D Zone for Eastbound Shipping
164
Diagram Summary Examples
167
2 Estimate of the Weather Loss Rate for the East Portion of the Route Design
168
3 Estimate of the Weather Loss Rate for the West Portion of the Route Design
172
4 Estimate of Weather Loss Rate by Ocean Currents
174
Summarizing the Comparison for Example One
175
202 SectionBased Evaluation
177
3 Estimating Weather Loss Rate for the West Portion of the Route Design
182
4 Estimating Weather Loss Rate by the Ocean Currents
185
Summarizing the Comparison for Example Two
186
203 Evaluation by the Elimination Method
187
2032 Example Two
190
2041 Example One
192
APPENDIX A
196
Atlantic Distance Tables New York to Le Havre
197
Pacific Distance Considerations
201
Pacific Distance Tables Tokyo to Lost Angeles
202
Mariners Guide to the 500 Millibar Chart
207
Glossary
218
Index
234
Colophon
244
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Sobre o autor (2008)

Lee Chesneau has 34 1/2 years experience in government and private industry analyzing and forecasting weather. Ma-Li Chen is a Master Mariner.

Informações bibliográficas