Cosmos, Self, and History in Baniwa Religion: For Those Unborn

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University of Texas Press, 1 de jan de 1998 - 314 páginas
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The Baniwa Indians of the Northwest Amazon have engaged in millenarian movements since at least the middle of the nineteenth century. The defining characteristic of these movements is usually a prophecy of the end of this present world and the restoration of the primordial, utopian world of creation. This prophetic message, delivered by powerful shamans, has its roots in Baniwa myths of origin and creation. In this ethnography of Baniwa religion, Robin M. Wright explores the myths of creation and how they have been embodied in religious movements and social action--particularly in a widespread conversion to evangelical Christianity. He opens with a discussion of cosmogony, cosmology, and shamanism and then goes on to explain how Baniwa origin myths have played an active role in shaping both personal and community identity and history. He also explores the concepts of death and eschatology and shows how the mythology of destruction and renewal in Baniwa religion has made the Baniwa people receptive to both Catholic and Protestant missionaries.
 

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Conteúdo

Introduction i
1
Cosmogony Cosmology and Shamanism
25
Guardians of the Cosmos
65
Creation of Self and Other in Myth and History
97
Death and Eschatology
161
When the Missions Came
217
Conclusion
286
Bibliography
305
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Sobre o autor (1998)

Wright has reported from more than 120 countries as a correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, CBS News, The Sunday Times, and the Christian Science Monitor.

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