Balancing Evils Judiciously: The Proslavery Writings of Zephaniah Kingsley

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Daniel W. Stowell
University Press of Florida, 2000 - 152 páginas
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For the first time, all the proslavery -- but also pro-black -- writings of Zephaniah Kingsley (1765-1843) appear together in one volume. Kingsley was a slave trader and the owner of a large plantation near Jacksonville in what was then Spanish East Florida. He married one of his slaves and had children with several others. Daniel Stowell carefully assembles all of Kingsley's writings on race and slavery to illuminate the evolution of his thought. The intriguing hybrid text of the four editions of the treatise clearly identifies both subtle and substantial differences among the editions. Other extensively annotated documents show how Kingsley's interracial family and his experiences in various slaveholding societies in the Caribbean and South America influenced his thinking on race, class, and slavery. Book jacket.

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Sobre o autor (2000)

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Eugene Genovese was educated at Brooklyn College and Columbia University, where he received his Ph.D. in 1959. He has served as Pitt Professor of American History at Cambridge University and Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the University Center in Georgia. An erudite, unconventional, and often unpredictable Marxist, Genovese has forced historians of the Old South---and especially of slavery---to think in new ways about important questions. Ranging over a multitude of topics, his work is concerned mainly with the relationship between economic factors, social conditions, and culture. Of his best-known work. Roll, Jordan, Roll (1974), David Brion Davis wrote: "Genovese's great gift is his ability to penetrate the minds of both slaves and masters, revealing not only how they viewed themselves and each other, but also how their contradictory perceptions interacted" (N.Y. Times Book Review).

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